Pulchritude: Cacao Tree

Unripe Cacao Pods

Chocolate is one of the most renowned and adored products in the world, though few are familiar with its source of origin, the Cacao Tree. Seeds of the Cacao tree also produce favorites such as cacao nibs, cocoa powder and cocoa butter. The Cacao tree (Theobroma cacao) is native to tropical regions of Central and South America, and typically grows between 13-26 feet tall. Leaves of the Cacao tree can be 10-40 centimeters in length and 5-20 centimeters in width. The flowers of the tree grow on the trunk or old branches and are pollinated by tiny flies. The fruit of the tree, the cacao pod, grows 15-30 centimeters in length and 8-10 centimeters in width. Orange to yellow in color, the cacao pod contains a white pulp and 20-60 seeds. The seeds are the roasted and processed to produce chocolate liquor, cocoa butter, cacao nibs, and various forms of chocolate. Cacao pods were highly valued in Mexico with Aztecs using them as currency. Cacao use in Mexico is believed to date back to at least 1750 BC to various pre-Aztec civilizations.

Advertisements

Product Review: Stonyfield Greek Yogurt (Part I)

Product Review: Stonyfield Greek Yogurt

This product was purchased by Nature’s Pulchritude.  All opinions are that of Nature’s Pulchritude and have not been influenced in any way, shape, or form.

Yogurt has been one of my favorite snacks for many years. Within the last 5 years, I switched from regular yogurt to greek yogurt and have not looked back.  My reasons were primarily nutritional–greek yogurt has more protein, no artificial sweeteners, and probiotics.  I had been predominately eating the same brand of yogurt since my switch and thought it was a good choice because the ingredients looked great and tasted good as well.  Several months ago a series of news reports were released that encouraged me switch to another brand which also had good quality ingredients.  Not too long after I switched to the new brand of greek yogurt another report came out suggesting that both brands used milk from GMO fed cows.  Why this never crossed my mind, I’m not sure.  Needless to say I decided to switch to Stonyfield Organic because they are the only brand of USDA certified organic greek yogurt sold in non-specialty stores.  I’ve tried almost all of the flavors offered and will be reviewing 2 of them today: Superfruit Berry & Cafe Latte.

Product

“Nature’s been getting it right for a long time. That’s why our products are made without the use of toxic persistent pesticides, artificial hormones, antibiotics and GMOs.”

Cafe Latte
Cafe Latte

Stonyfield Organic Greek Yogurt is very similar to other greek yogurts on the market, except it is certified organic by the USDA, which means the quality of the ingredients is presumably better. It is flavored and colored naturally. The Super Fruits contains 0 grams of fat, 12 grams of protein, 190 mg of Potassium, 17 grams of sugar and provides 15% of the recommended daily value of calcium. It also contains 85 milligrams of sodium, which is within the range of other flavored greek yogurts. Cafe Latte is very similar nutritionally, but contains only 60 milligrams of sodium and 18 grams of sugar. This product is certified gluten free.

Super Fruits: 0.95 Globe
Cafe Latte: 0.95 Globe

Flavor

 

Super Fruits
Super Fruits

Super Fruits: This flavor was great, it contains acai berry, pomegranate, and raspberries on the bottom. The fruit combination is unique. It has a nice sweetness to it without being too sweet. It mixes to a light ‘berry’ color similar to a reddish-purple.

Cafe Latte: The coffee scent was quite strong from this product. The coffee taste was also strong but the after taste was a little bitter. It is also a unique flavor. This is pre mixed and is a light brown color.

Super Fruits: 1 Globe
Cafe Latte: 0.85 Globe

Texture

This product is very similar in texture to other greek yogurts on the market, however it does not have the same thick yet air consistency as authentic greek yogurt. In some instances there was a bit of water that separated out but it was fine once mixed

Super Fruits: 0.95 Globe
Cafe Latte: 0.95 Globe

EnviroFactor

Ingredients:

Super Fruits Ingredients
Super Fruits Ingredients
Cafe Latte Ingredients
Cafe Latte Ingredients

The ingredients in both flavors are great. The product is USDA certified organic, therefore the majority of the ingredients are organic. There are no questionable ingredients, just wholesome goodness.

Super Fruits: 1 Globe
Cafe Latte: 1 Globe

Overall, these were both good greek yogurts.  They are both certified organic and are unique flavor offerings.  The great nutritional value of these yogurts are excellent, making them an excellent snack for all ages.

Super Fruits:
3.95/4 Globes
Nature’s Pulchritude All-Star!

Cafe Latte:
3.75/4 Globes

Each container of yogurt is 5.3 ounces (150 grams) and retails for about $2.25. While that seems like a lot for 1 small container of greek yogurt, but this product periodically goes on sale for less than half the price! That’s right, you can get the high quality of organic greek yogurt for the same price as non organic greek yogurt brands!

 

Have you tried this product, what was your opinion? Will you try this product?

How to Read Cosmetic Ingredient Labels XVII

Today you picked up a facial cleanser and makeup remover that caught your eye in a local drug store.  It is a natural product made by a mainstream brand that drew your attention.  You liked many of the environmentally friendly attributes on the bottle, as well as the logo of a known environmental organization.  Did you make a selection that meets your Label Poise?  Remember, I am teaching you Label Poise–how to walk the walk, talk the talk, and buy products that meet YOUR standards, whether natural, organic, or safe enough.

Here are the tips I gave you in my first sixteen posts on how to read cosmetic ingredient labels:

  1. Ingredients are listed by quantity in the formula, from greatest to least, based on standards by the Federal Trade Commission (FTC).
  2. Ingredients are listed using the International Nomenclature of Cosmetics Ingredients (INCI), therefore they are listed using scientific nomenclature, or    binomial nomenclature (latin; taxonomy) for ingredients derived from plants.
  3. How ingredients are derived is seldom listed on the label (the same chemical can be derived synthetically or naturally).
  4. Fragrances are generically listed because they are considered trade secrets; typically naturally derived fragrances do not use “Fragrance (Parfum)” but a specific naming system.
  5. If it looks like a “chemical” it probably is, if you don’t want chemicals don’t buy it!  **Everything is a chemical, I’m referring to ‘bad’ chemicals here

Quick Tip:  Aside from avoiding synthetic chemicals as much as possible, have an idea of what ingredients do not work as well for you.  Pay attention to the ingredients in the products you use.  If you notice every time you use a product with [insert ingredient here] you get an allergic reaction or your hair/skin responds negatively, make a note and steer clear!

The Label

LabelPoise17

The Ingredients

Water:  Safe!  Water is the ultimate moisturizer and is a key ingredient in many moisturizing products.

Cocamidopropyl Hydroxysultaine:  Beware!  This ingredient is a mild amphoteric (reacts as a base and an acid) synthetic surfactant, and the bottle indicates this product is derived from coconut/palm. This ingredient is not believed to be an eye or skin irritant, though an additional study found it to be a skin allergen in a patch test. It is not believed to be a carcinogen, mutagen, teratogen, or reproductive toxin, though there is limited information available. (MSDS)

Sodium Lauroyl Sarcosinate:  Beware!  Sodium Lauroyl Sarcosinate is a mild ionic surfactant that is a sodium salt of lauroyl sarcosine, which was derived from coconut and palm kernel. It is also used as a foaming and hair conditioning. It is considered safe when used in concentrations less than 5%, though there is concern over contamination with nitrosamine, a carcinogen. It is considered a skin and eye irritant in pure form. There is no information available on carcinogenicity, mutagenicity, developmental toxicity, or teratogenicity. (MSDS;MSDS)

Cocamidopropyl Betaine:  Beware!  This ingredient is a synthetic surfactant derived from coconut oil and dimethylamonipropylamine.    This ingredient can be a skin allergen and irritant and was voted Allergen of the Year in 2004 by the American Contact Dermatitis Society. It is also an eye and lung irritant, though it is not known to be carcinogenic or mutagenic.  (MSDS)

Glycerin:  Safe! Glycerin is a humectant that attracts moisture in the skin.  The Glycerin in this product is vegetable derived.   (MSDS)

Hydrolyzed Caesalpina Spinosa Gum:  Beware!/Avoid!  This ingredient is derived from the Peruvian Tara Seed. It is used as a an absorbent, emollient, and skin conditioning agent. It is considered safe by the Cosmetic Ingredient Review in concentrations between 0.002-0.4%, which is the current usage range. There is very limited information about this ingredient. No MSDS.

Caesalpinia Spinosa Gum:  Beware!/Avoid!  This ingredient is derived from the Peruvian Tara Seed. It is used as a an emulsion stabilizer and skin conditioning agent. It is considered safe by the Cosmetic Ingredient Review in concentrations in its current usage range. No MSDS.

Coco-Glucoside:  Safe!  This ingredient is a non-ionic surfactant that can be used as a foaming agent, emulsifier, or conditioner.  It is typically derived from coconut oil, corn (GMO?), or fruit sugars, though it is dependent on the supplier.  The label of this product just says it was derived from a ‘vegetable’ source, which is likely one of the aforementioned.  This ingredient is biodegradable and is not known to be carcinogenic, mutagenic, or teratogenic.  In pure form Coco-Glucoside can be a skin irritant or cause inhalation irritation.  (MSDS)

Glyceryl Oleate:  Safe!  This ingredient consists of oleic acid and glycerin both from vegetable sources as indicated on the bottle.  It is used as an emollient, emulsifier, and fragrance ingredient.  (MSDS)

Glycol Distearate:  Beware!  This ingredient is used as an emollient. It is the diester of ethylene glycol and stearic acid, which is vegetable derived. It is typically used in concentrations of 0.5 – 4%. There is no data available about hazards, caricnogenicity, or mutagenicity.  (MSDS)

Guar Hydroxypropyltrimonium Chloride: Beware! This ingredient is quaternary ammonium derivative of guar gum, which is made from the guar bean indicated on the bottle. It acts as a skin conditioning and viscosity controlling agent, and detangler.  It can be an eye irritant in pure form though it is not expected to be a skin irritant.  It is not believed to be a carcinogen, however, there is not information on mutagenicity.  (MSDSMSDS)

Caprylyl Glycol: Beware! Caprylyl Glycol is used as a humectant, emollient, and wetting agent that also has anti-microbial properties. This ingredient can be synthetic or naturally derived though that information is not indicated on the bottle. It is not believed to be a skin or eye irritant, nor is it considered a mutagen. (MSDS)

Acrylates Copolymer:  Beware!  This ingredient is used as a binding, film forming, and antistatic agent. It can be found in a variety of products including nail polish, hair sprays, sunscreen and mascara. It is not known to be carcinogenic or mutagenic, thought it may be a skin or eye irritant. (MSDS)

Potassium Sorbate:  Safe!/Beware!  This ingredient is the potassium salt of sorbic acid, which is likely synthetically derived though it is naturally occurring in some berry species. It is widely used as a preservative in food, wine, and personal care products. It is known to be a skin, eye, and lung irritant in pure form, though it is not generally considered to be a carcinogen, mutagen or teratogen in humans, however, additional research suggests that is is mutagenic and genotoxic in human blood cells (in vitro). It is typically not used in concentration above 0.2%, so it should be fine in this product.  (MSDS)

Benzyl Alcohol: Beware! This ingredient is made naturally by many plants or can be synthetically derived. It is typically used as a preservative and based on its placement on the list is in low concentration. Benzyl Alcohol is not known to be a carcinogen or teratogen, though it is a mutagen in bacteria and yeast, and may be toxic to the liver and central nervous system in pure form. Benzyl Alcohol can be slightly hazardous with skin contact, but due to its concentration it should be okay. (MSDS)

Fragrance:  Beware! Fragrances are often synthetic. Though they are low in concentration in the product, here is still a small chance of having an allergic reaction.

 

Nature’s Pulchritude’s Verdict:   I would consider purchasing this product.  While several of the ingredients are labeled Beware! , it is more so because of a lack of information than known hazards.  An issue with this product is the listing of the origin of the ingredients.  Some ingredients have the word derived while others do not.  The primary reason for this is because some ingredients, such as Cocamidopropyl Hydroxysultaine, may have used a component derived from a natural source though the overall ingredient is synthetic and has been significantly altered chemically to create the final product.  This product may list the origin as coconut derived, which is true, thought it may be misleading a customer to think it is not synthetic or completely naturally derived.  The ingredients are better than many other cleansers and makeup removers on the market, and also boasts a bottle made from 50% post consumer recycled material.  How they list their ingredients is really commendable and appreciated because a vast majority of other companies do not.

 

Would you purchase this product?

Organic Farming Is Not Sustainable

A little over a week ago Henry I. Miller wrote an opinion piece for the Wall Street Journal titled “Organic Farming Is Not Sustainable.”  As you can imagine there is a bit of controversy over this statement.  I won’t post the full article here, but I will include bullet points and key excepts below.

  • Organic farming is touted as being sustainable and a method to contribute to sustainable food security, however, available information does not support that notion
  • Organic matter used as fertilizer has resulted in an increase in nitrates in groundwater, which is troublesome in areas experiencing drought
  • Large scale composting produces significant amounts of methane and nitrous oxide (both greenhouse gases).  Composting can also deposit pathogens in groundwater, which can lead to food poisoning.
  • Output from organic farms is 20-50% less than conventional agriculture. This leads to increased water consumption, as well as higher ammonia and nitrous oxide emissions, nitrogen leaching, land use, eutrophication and acidification potential per product unit.  All of which, with the exception of water consumption, are higher than conventional farming.
  • Organic farming used some pesticides that are very toxic to either mammals and/or fish.
  • Perhaps the most illogical and least sustainable aspect of organic farming in the long term is the exclusion of “genetically modified organisms,” but only those that were modified with the most precise and predictable techniques such as gene splicing. Except for wild berries and wild mushrooms, virtually all the fruits, vegetables and grains in our diet have been genetically improved by one technique or another, often through what are called wide crosses, which move genes from one species or genus to another in ways that do not occur in nature. Therefore, the exclusion from organic agriculture of organisms simply because they were crafted with modern, superior techniques makes no sense. It also denies consumers of organic goods nutritionally improved foods, such as oils with enhanced levels of omega-3 fatty acids.

  • Organic farming is for ‘social elites,’ and is not following the advances in agriculture that are “more environmentally friendly and sustainable than ever.

 

Reading the first few paragraphs I thought it was likely this piece was written by someone who is anti-organic farming and pro GMOs, hence this very biased piece.  When I got to the quoted paragraph I knew I was right.  Technology is great when used properly, but the safety of GMOs is unfounded nor is the impact of heavy pesticides on humans, the environment, or wildlife.  In short, be very leery of the information you take in and always pay attention to who is writing and their interests or you may be mislead by bias.

 

Have you read this article?  Share your thoughts in the comments!

Pulchritude: Kukui Tree

 

Kukui or Candlenut Trees are best known in southeast Asia and the Hawaiian islands for its use as a culinary ingredient, medicine, and cosmetic. Kukui trees grow between 49-82 feet in height, with leaves that grown 10-20 centimeters in length. The trees nut is typically 4-6 centimeters in diameter and encases a seed with a high oil content. Aleurites moluccanus is often used to make candles, which is why the true is sometimes called a Candlenut. Kukui nuts is used to make sauces and condiments in Hawaii, Indonesia, and Malaysia, and is used as a medicine in Japan. Kukui oil is believed to be rich in omega-3’s. The kukui tree serves a multitude of addition purposes. Its nuts were burned to provide light in ancient Hawaii, is presently used to make ink for tattoos, leis, and as a moisturizer on skin and hair. Kukui is the state tree of Hawaii.

How to Read Cosmetic Ingredient Labels XVI

Babies and young children are often most vulnerable to potentially dangerous chemicals in cosmetics. Are the products you use on your baby safe?   This baby shampoo is made by a company that is known for environmentally products, so you trust the product based on brand recognition.  Though many people base their shopping on brand recognition and reputation, this is not always a good idea.  Did you make the right choice by purchasing this product?  Remember, I am teaching you Label Poise–how to walk the walk, talk the talk, and buy products that meet YOUR standards, whether natural, organic, or safe enough.

The Label

LabelPoise16

The Ingredients

Aqua (Water):  Safe!  Water is the ultimate moisturizer and is a key ingredient in any moisturizing product.

Decyl Glucoside:  Safe!  This ingredient is derived from the reaction of glucose from corn starch (GMO?)  with decanol (fatty alcohol) of coconuts.  Decyl Glucoside is a non-ionic surfactant that can be used as a foaming agent, emulsifier, or conditioner.  It is biodegradable and is not known to be toxic, carcinogenic, mutagenic, or teratogenic (MSDS).

Sodium Coco Sulfate:  Avoid!/Beware! This ingredient is derived from various isolated fatty acids in coconut oil. This product is similar to/contains sodium lauryl sulfate, but contains other fatty acids such as capric, caprylic, oleic, and stearyl. Each fatty acid is reacted with sulfuric acid, then sodium carbonate, which produced sodium [fatty acid] sulfate. The term ‘coco’ is used to avoid using the individual name of each fatty acid that is derived from coconut oil. Though sodium coco sulfate contains sodium lauryl sulfate it is not believed to be as harsh, though it has similar concerns to sodium lauryl sulfate. This ingredient is a surfactant and is typically used in concentrations of 1-15% of the formula. There is no toxicological information on this ingredient, though it has the same concerns about skin and eye irritation as sodium lauryl sulfate. Given that babies have more sensitive skin than adults and there is no toxicity information on this ingredient, it is best to Avoid! for babies, and Beware! for adults. (MSDS)

Glycerin:  Safe!  Glycerin is a humectant that attracts moisture in the skin. Glycerine can be derived from fats and oils, or synthetically–which is not indicated here.  (MSDS)

Olive Leaf Extract:  Beware!  Olive Leaf extract is used for its skin conditioning, antioxidant, anti-inflamatory, and antimicrobial properties.  It is not known to be carcinogenic, mutagenic, teratogenic, or cause developmental toxicity.  This ingredient can be a skin, eye, lung, and digestive irritant in pure form (MSDS)

Aloe Vera Powder:  Safe!  This is the inner leaf of the aloe vera plant that has been processed into a powder form. Aloe gel from the inner leave is pasteurized and concentrated using low temperature evaporation. The product is then freeze dried to preserve freshness and alleviated the need for a preservative. Aloe vera powder is non-toxic, is not a carcinogen, and is not known to be a skin or eye irritant. Information on mutagenicity is not available. (MSDS; MSDS)

Magnesium Chloride: Safe!  Magnesium Chloride (MgCl2) is a natural inorganic salt that can be extracted from brine or sea water. It can be produced using various chemical reactions. It is used to increase viscosity of the water (aqueous) portion of a cosmetic formulation. Magnesium Chloride is generally considered safe by the FDA. In pure form it can be a skin irritant and targets the kidneys. It is typically used in low concentrations and should be of minimal concern. It is not known to be a carcinogen. (MSDS; MSDS)

Citric Acid:  Safe!  This ingredient is naturally occurring in citrus fruits, but is typically produced by feeding sucrose or glucose to mold and additional chemical treatment.  It is used in cosmetics as a pH adjuster.  It is generally considered safe, though it is a skin and eye irritant in pure form. (MSDS)

Essential Oils and Botanical Extracts:

      • Citrus Aurantium Dulcis (Orange) Peel Oil: Safe!  Orange Peel Oil is used as a skin conditioning agent and fragrant.
      • Citrus Grandis (Grapefruit) Peel Oil:  Safe!/ Beware!   Grapefruit Peel Oil is used as a skin conditioning agent and fragrant.  This ingredient has use restrictions in the EU, but should be fine for use in this product. (MSDS)
      • Citrus Nobilis (Mandarin Orange) Peel Oil:  Beware! Mandarin Orange Peel Oil is used as a skin conditioning agent and fragrant. This product should be avoided while pregnant, and likely is not safe for babies. Concentrations in this product are very low and are rinsed off, so exercise caution. (MSDS)

Sodium Benzoate and Potassium Sorbate:

      • Sodium Benzoate:  Safe!  This ingredient is the potassium salt of sorbic acid, which is likely synthetically derived though it is naturally occurring in some berry species.  It is widely used as a preservative in food, wine, and personal care products.  It is known to be a skin, eye, and lung irritant in pure form, though it is not generally considered to be a carcinogen, mutagen, or teratogen in humans, however, additional research suggests that is is mutagenic and genotoxic in human blood cells (in vitro).  It is typically not used in concentrations above 0.2%, so it should be fine in this product.  (MSDS)
      • Potassium Sorbate:  Safe!/Beware!  This ingredient is the sodium salt of benzoic acid, and is commonly used as a preservative in food and cosmetics.  This ingredient is typically synthetically derived.  The FDA mandates that this ingredient is not to exceed 0.1% of the formula by weight.  When combined with ascorbic acid (Vitamin C), sodium benzoate can react to form benzene, a known carcinogen–this product contains a form of Vitamin C.  These claims have been substantiated by the FDA, though the benzene levels are considered less than World Health Organization limits to be considered dangerous.  Sodium benzoate is not known to be carcinogenic, mutagenic, or neurotoxic, though it can be teratogenic in embryos and fetuses.  This ingredient may cause skin and eye irritation in pure form.  (MSDS)

Tetrasodium Iminodisccinate:  Avoid!  This ingredient is a chealator that binds to mineral deposits and soap scum to prevent them from depositing on skin and allows them to be rinsed away. No MSDS found.

 

 

Nature’s Pulchritude’s Verdict: This product looked promising at first glance.  The only ingredients that were questionable were Magnesium Chloride and Tetrasodium Iminodisuccinate.  In actuality, Sodium Coco Sulfate was an unsuspecting concern.  This product is far better than the commonly found baby products, though it still has questionable ingredients. Sodium Coco Sulfate is a key example of deceptive marketing.  The word ‘coco’ leads many consumers to believe that the ingredient is naturally (coconut) derived and therefore safe.  Sodium Coco Sulfate and Tetrasodium Iminodisuccinate are both rated Avoid! because of lack of information, though they may not be hazardous.  Essential Oils can also be of minor concern, though they should be okay for use in this product given it is to be rinsed off, and is likely in low concentrations.  Err on the side of caution and skip this product unless your only other options are ‘conventional’ baby products.

 

Would you purchase this product?  Tell us in the comments!

Thank you for reading!

Organic products grew to $35.1 billion in sales

Organic may only be a small segment of the food industry, but its growth over the last year and projected growth over the next few years shows that organic food is here to stay.  Investments in organic food are likely to allow this niche market to continue to grow.  Increased competition may decrease costs and thus increase accessibility of organic food.

Organic products grew to $35.1 billion in sales

David Pierson, May 15, 2014, 11:53 a.m. –Nationwide sales of organic products continued to experience healthy growth last year, jumping 11.5% to $35.1 billion, according to the Organic Trade Assn.

The Washington-based group representing organic businesses said growth rates are expected to at least keep pace the next two years.

Image Copyright Spencer Platt/Getty Images

“The U.S. organic market is experiencing strong expansion, with organic food and farming continuing to gain in popularity,” Laura Batcha, executive director and chief executive of the trade association, said Thursday. “Consumers are making the correlation between what we eat and our health, and that knowledge is spurring heightened consumer interest in organic products.”

Organic foods are generally pesticide-free products grown with natural fertilizers. There are a handful exceptions for fruit growers and egg producers that are being debated within the industry. Processed foods must contain 95% organic ingredients to be labeled organic.

In the clearest sign that organic foods have become big business, Walmart announced last month that it was cutting prices for its organic foods. The move aimed at garnering more market share of the niche category at its stores was a direct challenge to industry stalwarts such as Whole Foods.

Organic food represents just over 4% of the nation’s $760-billion food industry.  Food sales as a whole are growing much slower than organics at around 3% annually, according to the Organic Trade Assn.

The group said food made up the majority of the $35.1 billion in organic sales last year, but also included nonfood organic products such as flowers, fiber, household products and pet food.

Fruit and vegetables led the sector with $11.6 billion in sales, up 15%. The group also said the organic condiments category posted the strongest growth — expanding 17% to reach sales of $830 million.

Organic snack foods grew 15% to $1.7 billion and organic bread and grain rose 12% to $3.8 billion.

 

Pulchritude: Coconut Tree

The fruit of the coconut tree is used for a variety of culinary and cosmetic purposes, which yields milk, water, and oil. Coconut palm trees are traditionally grown and cultivated in the warm humid tropics that aid their growth. The coconut palm (Cocos nucifera) tree is believed to be native to either the Americas or Melanesia and the islands of southeast Asia. Unlike many other plants, nucifera is the only species in the Cocos genus. The coconut palm tree can grow up to 98 feet tall, with leaves that grow between 13 feet and 20 feet in length. The coconut is actually a drupe, not a nut, that has three layers with the endocarp containing the meat, and water of the coconut. The meat of the coconut is dried to create copra which is then pressed for oil or raw coconut can be used to produce oil. The meat of brown coconut is grated and strained to produce coconut milk. Coconut water is the liquid contained in the endocarp of the coconut. The name coconut is derived from the Spanish and Portuguese word for head or skull, as they felt the 3 holes on the coconut resembled a face.

How to Read Cosmetic Ingredient Labels XV

This post is by request!  This product is an intensive moisturizing conditioner that can be found in drugstores and beauty supply stores.  If you would like to see a product featured in Label Poise feel free to ask in the comments or send an e-mail via the contact page!

 

Here are my tips on how to read cosmetic ingredient labels:

  1. Ingredients are listed by quantity in the formula, from greatest to least, based on standards by the Federal Trade Commission (FTC).
  2. Ingredients are listed using the International Nomenclature of Cosmetics Ingredients (INCI), therefore they are listed using scientific nomenclature, or    binomial nomenclature (latin; taxonomy) for ingredients derived from plants.
  3. How ingredients are derived is seldom listed on the label (the same chemical can be derived synthetically or naturally).
  4. Fragrances are generically listed because they are considered trade secrets; typically naturally derived fragrances do not use “Fragrance (Parfum)” but a specific naming system.
  5. If it looks like a “chemical” it probably is, if you don’t want chemicals don’t buy it!  **Everything is a chemical, I’m referring to ‘bad’ chemicals here
The Label

LabelPoise15

The Ingredients

Water (Eau):  Safe! Water is the ultimate moisturizer and is a key ingredient in any moisturizing product.

Glycerin:  Safe! Glycerin is a humectant that attracts moisture in the skin. Glycerine can be derived from fats and oils, or synthetically–which is not indicated here.  (MSDS)

Cetearyl Alcohol:  Safe! Typically naturally derived from Coconut and Palm Oils (though it can be derived synthetically), it is a mixture of Cetyl and Stearyl fatty alcohols.  This ingredient acts as a thickener and moisturizer in personal care products.  In pure form,  this ingredient can be a slight skin irritant and permeator, and is toxic to mucous membranes.  The is no data available on human toxicity, carcinogenicity, mutagenicity, developmental toxicity, and teratogenicity.  (MSDS)

Cetyl Alcohol:  Safe! This is a fatty alcohol that is often used as an emollient and emulsifier in conditioners. It is typically derived naturally from coconut or palm oil.  (MSDS)

Dicetyldimonium Chloride:  Beware!/Avoid!  This ingredient is a quarternary ammonium salt that is used as an emulsifier, surfactant, anti-static agent, and conditioning agent.  Dicetyldimonium Chloride is chemically known as Dihexadecyldimethylammonium chloride.  There is very limited information on this ingredient.  Though it is not believed to be a carcinogen it is a suspected human allergen.  No MSDS found for specific ingredient, however, MSDS found for similar ingredient (Centrimonium Chloride) shows it is a skin and eye irritant and may absorb through the skin. (MSDS)

Polyquarternium-37:  Beware!  Polyquaternium-37 is a polycationic polymer which consist of quarternary ammonium salts.  It is also known as Poly(2-methacryloxyethyltrimethylammonium chloride).  It is an anti-static agent and film former that is positively charged, which is believed to counteract the negative charges commonly found in shampoos.  This ingredient is a potential skin irritant and may be absorbed through the skin; it may also be an eye irritant in pure form.  There is no data on human or environmental toxicity, though it is not believed to be a carcinogen.  This ingredient may be fine to use if you chemically relax your hair or use harsh dyes, otherwise feel free to skip this ingredient.  (MSDS)

Lanolin Oil:  Safe!  Lanolin Oil is actually a wax made from the secretions of the sebaceous glands of animals with wool.  It is similar to petroleum in that is creates a barrier around the hair or skin that reduces water loss (or entrance) of the skin.  Though this ingredient is all natural, it is not a preferred ‘oil.’  It is a slight irritant and skin permeator in pure form, though it is not believed to be carcinogenic, teratogenic, mutagenic, or a developmental toxin.   Avoid! if you are vegan.  (MSDS)

PEG-12 Dimethicone: Beware!   This ingredient is 12 molecule polyethylene glycol combined with dimethicone, making it a silicone-based polymer.  It can also be described as an ethoxylated polymidethylsilocane.  It is used to improve spreadability and create a smooth feeling.  It is typically used in concentrations of 0.5-3%.  It can be a skin and eye irritant in pure form.  This ingredient, along with various other ethoxylated chemicals and PEGs, may be contaminated with carcinogenic chemicals such as 1,4-dioxane and Ethylene oxide, as well as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs).  (MSDS)

Propylene Glycol Dicaprylate/Dicaprate:  Beware!  This ingredient is a mixture of esters of propylene glycol and fatty acids caprylic acid and capric acid.  It is primarily used as a viscosity increaser (thickener) and occlusive (blocking) skin conditioning agent.  Propylene Glycol Dicaprylate/Dicaprate is not considered comedogenic (skin clogging) and is not suspected to be a mutagen, skin irritant or sensitizer.  It is a suspected penetration enhancer and environmental toxin.  (Propylene Glycol Dicaprylate MSDS)

Behentrimonium Methosulfate:  Beware!  This ingredient is a surfactant, detangling agent, anti-static agent, and hair thickener.  It is commonly derived from colza or rapeseed oil.  This product is typically combined with Cetearyl alcohol, also in this product, as a 75%/25% mix with BTMS being the lower component.  No individual MSDS found.  I have used this ingredient in a product before and had no ill effects, but it is listed as beware being that there is very limited information on it.  (MSDS [Cetearyl Alcohol & Behentrimonium Methosulfate])

Polyquaternium-10:   Beware!  This ingredient is a polymeric quaternary ammonium salt of hydroyethyly-cellulose and is used as an anti-static agent and film former.  Polyquaternium-10 readily bonds to hair proteins and increases viscosity (thickness) of the conditioner.  It is typically used in concentrations between 0.2% – 2%.  At greater concentrations it can cause skin irritation.  No data available on carcinogenicity or mutagenicity.  It is not believed to be genotoxic.  I would not use this product unless you chemically relax or treat your hair.  (MSDS)

Amodimethicone:  Beware!/Avoid!  This ingredient is a derivative of silica and is used as an anti-static film forming agent.  Silicone polymers typically are not toxic though they are not the best ingredients for hair due to their film forming properties which prevent moisture from entering the hair shaft.  No toxicological data available. (MSDS)

Phenyl Trimethicone:  Beware!/Avoid! This ingredient is also a derivative of silica with a phenyl substitution. It is a silicone that is used as an anti-foaming and skin conditioning agent. Phenyl trimethicone is a suspected environmental toxin, though overall very limited information is available. No toxicological information available.  (MSDS)

Isopropyl Alcohol:  Beware!  This is a drying alcohol (unlike fatty alcohols).  Isopropyl Alcohol is a solvent, and if the name sounds familiar it is because it is commonly sold as rubbing alcohol.  I am not sure what purpose this ingredient serves in this product, supposedly to assist in spreading the product.  Isopropyl Alcohol in hair products is supposedly very drying, though this is not definitively true.  This ingredient typically is not toxic, therefore I will not solidly classify this as ‘Avoid!

Dimethiconol:  Beware! Dimethiconol is a silicone that acts as a skin conditioner and emollient.  It forms a protective barrier on the skin prevent moisture from entering or escaping and is larger than silicones like dimethicone and cyclopentasiloxane.  When paired with lighter silicones, such as in this product, dimethiconol has an greater likelihood of being effective.  It is unlikely to penetrate the skin. Dimethiconol is believed to cause reproductive toxicity via inhalation, though it is not expected to be a skin irritant.  The concentration in this product is low so it is not a high concern. (MSDS)

Isostearyl Ethylimidazolinium Ethosulfate:  Avoid!  This ingredient is a quaternary ammonium salt and is used as an anti-static and hair conditioning agent.  This ingredient can be a skin irritant in pure form, no additional toxicological information available.  (MSDS)

PPG-1 Trideceth-6:  Avoid!  This ingredient is a synthetic polyoxypropylene and polyoxyethylene ether of tridecyl alcohol (fatty).  It is also known as Polyoxypropylen(1) Polyoxyethylen(1) Tridecylether.  It is an emollient and emulsion stabilizer. This ingredient may contain traces of Ethylene Oxide and 1,4-dioxane from the polyoxypropylene and polyoxyethylene, which is a suspected carcinogen.  The Cosmetic Ingredient Review considered PPG-1 Tricedeth to be not irritating and relatively safe when used in concentrations of 0.024%-0.3% of the formula.  Whether or not this produce falls into this range is unknown, however, if it does the remaining ingredients (including Argan oil) are very low in concentration.  Propylene glycol is also believed to be a penetration enhancer.  Very limited additional information on toxicity. No MSDS found.

Panthenol:  Safe!  This ingredient is a provitamin of B5.  Panthenol is an alcohol analog of Vitamin B5 (pantothenic acid).  It is used as an anti-static and conditioning agent.  It can be derived from plants or animals therefore it may not be vegan friendly. There is debate about what benefits panthenol can actually provide to hair as a vitamin being that hair is not living.  Panthenol is a mild skin and eye irritant in pure form, though there is no information on carcinogenicity, teratogenicity, mutagenicity, or developmental toxicity.  It is low on the list of ingredients and should not be a concern.  (MSDS; MSDS)

Propylene Glycol:  Beware!/Avoid!  Propylene Glycol aka PPG is used as a penetration enhancer, humectant, and stabilizes the product despite temperature changes.  This ingredient is not believed to be carcinogenic or a developmental toxin, though it may be contaminated with impurities such as Ethylene Oxide and 1,4-dioxane which are carcinogens.  It is a suspected mutagen and teratogen.  It is believed to be a skin irritant.  In pure form it can be toxic to the central nervous system and may cause target organ damage (lungs and kidneys) with prolonged or repeated exposure.  This ingredient is low on this list and should only be a low-moderate concern.  (MSDS)

Argania Spinosa (Argan) Kernel Oil:  Safe!  This oil is made from the kernels of the argan tree found in Morocco. It is high in oleic and linoleic fatty acids and is renowned for its hair repairing and moisturizing properties. (MSDS)

Hydrolyzed Wheat Protein:  Safe!  This ingredient is naturally derived and contains wheat oligosaccharides (carbohydrates) and acts as a moisturizer and film former to nourish skin (or hair). It is not known to be a carcinogen or mutagen, though it can cause eye and dermal irritation in pure form.  Avoid! if you have a gluten allergy. (MSDS)

Olea Europaea (Olive) Fruit Oil:  Safe! Olive oil is used for its skin conditioning and anti-inflammatory properties. It is rich in vitamins E and A, as well as antioxidants.  (MSDS)

Mel (Honey) (Miel):  Safe!  Honey is a humectant that draws moisture into the hair, which helps to maintain elasticity, shine, and overall health of hair.

Cocodimonium Hydroxypropyl Hydrolyzed Wheat Protein:  Avoid! This ingredient is used as an anti-static and hair conditioning agent. Very limited information. No MSDS found.

Aloe Barbadensis Leaf Juice:  Safe!  This ingredient is used for its nutrient content and moisturizing properties.  (MSDS)

Parfum (Fragrance):  Beware!  Fragrances are often synthetic. Though they are low in concentration in the product, here is still a small chance of having an allergic reaction.

Phenoxyethanol:  Beware!/Avoid!  This is a preservative.  You will notice it is very high on the list of ingredients.    It is used because it is safer than formaldehyde-releasing preservatives, though the FDA released a warning about how it can impact the central nervous system and induce vomiting in infants.  It is also suspected to be a xenoestrogen (mimics estrogen), a cause of contact dermatitis and skin irritant.  In pure form phenoxyethanol is toxic to kidneys, the nervous system, and liver; it is an extremely hazardous eye irritant and a very hazardous eye irritant, though information on carcinogenicity, mutagenicity, teratogenicity, and developmental toxicity are not available.  It is banned in the EU and Japan in concentrations over 1%.  Therefore, one would assume it is either greater than the EU concentration restraint or it is in accordance, and the remaining ingredients in this product are at very low concentrations.  This ingredient is made from 2 carcinogens (benzene and ethylene oxide), though it itself is not known to be carcinogenic.  People around small children should ‘Avoid!‘ this ingredient, others should ‘Beware!‘.  (MSDS)

Methylisothiazolinone:  Beware!  This preservative is a known skin irritant, sensitizer, and allergen; lung and eye irritant.  Methylisothiazolinone has been linked to allergic contact dermatitis was named Contact Allergen of the Year in 2013.  It is also believed to cause burns in pure form.  This ingredient is also believed to be cytotoxic (toxic to living cells) and neurotoxic (toxic tot he nervous system) based on various studies, though information has been refuted due to the low exposure based on quantity in cosmetic formulas.  It is not known to be carcinogenic.  This ingredient is one of many that have been used to replace parabens. Methylisothiazolinone is also very toxic to aquatic organisms in pure form.  Limited to no greater than 0.0015% in rinse of products in EU and US (in conjuction with Methylisothiazolinone 3:1). (MSDS)

 

 

Nature’s Pulchritude’s Verdict: The first 4 ingredients in this product are pretty good, then it all goes downhill from there.  This product is marketed with Argan Oil, though it is the 20th ingredient on the list–20th!  Argan oil along with olive oil, honey, and several of the other beneficial ingredients in this product are so low in concentration they likely do not make much of a difference.  Most of the ingredients in this product are labeled as Beware! or Avoid!, mainly due to lack of information.  Many of the ingredients in this product can be useful to those with relaxed or chemically treated hair.  I would not purchase this product or suggest it to anyone who is does not have chemically relaxed or treated hair.

 

Would you purchase this product?

Thank you for reading!

Aubrey Organics Shampoo and Conditioner Ingredients Have Changed

I have been a long time user of Aubrey Organics’s Honeysuckle Rose Conditioner  and have tried several of their other products as well.  I knew the company was looking to revamp itself and perhaps give its products a facelift image wise.  It turns out the changes the company made went beyond aesthetics–they changed the formula in addition to the packaging!!  Aubrey Organics has been suspected on changing their formulas within the last 1-2 years because of changes in product and performance, but it was passed off as changing their ingredient labeling to INCI (International Nomenclature of Cosmetic Ingredients) standards.  Now it is certain they have changed their formulas completely.  There are surely a fair amount of people that are likely irritated by these changes because they were staple products for a lot of people.  This is why it is so important to always read the label of products you use!  Companies change their formulas and that can be very frustrating when you have found a product that really works for you!  Below are detailed comparisons of the ingredients in the old and new Aubrey Organics Honeysuckle Rose Moisturizing Shampoo and Conditioner, GPB Balancing Shampoo and Conditioner, Rosa Mosqueta Nourishing Conditioner, and White Camellia Ultra-Smoothing Conditioner:

Removed ingredients are struck through, added ingredients are bold & italicized, Ingredients that have changed in listing are underlined. All ingredient lists are from the Aubrey Organics website unless otherwise noted.

CONDITIONERS

Honeysuckle Rose Moisturizing Conditioner

Old (L) and New (R) Packaging and Formulas

Old Ingredients:

INGREDIENTS INCI: Aqua, cetyl alcohol, alcohol denat. (38b, lavender*), butyrospermum parkii (shea butter)*, triticum vulgare (wheat) germ oil, lonicera caprifolium (honeysuckle) extract, aloe barbadensis (aloe) leaf juice*, glycerin, simmondsia chinensis (jojoba) seed oil*, rosa rubignosa (Rosa Mosqueta®) seed oil*, citrus grandis (grapefruit) extract, tocopheryl acetate, foeniculum vulgare (fennel) fruit extract, humulus lupulus (hops) extract, melissa officinalis (balm mint) leaf extract, chamomilla recutita (matricaria) extractglycine soja (soybean) oil, daucus carota sativa (carrot) root extract, beta-carotene, hamamelis virginiana (witch hazel) water, angelica archangelica extract, chrysanthemum sinense flower extract, magnolia biondii flower extract, ascorbic acid. *Organic

New Ingredients:

INGREDIENTS: Aqua, cetyl alcohol (from coconut), alcohol denat. (38b, lavender), butyrospermum parkii (shea) butter*, fragrance‡‡, aloe barbadensis leaf juice*, glycerin, rosa rubiginosa (Rosa Mosqueta®) seed oil*, macadamia ternifolia seed oil*, prunus amygdalus dulcis (sweet almond) oil*, argania spinosa (argan) nut oil*, citrus grandis (grapefruit) extract, ascorbic acid (vitamin C), tocopherol (vitamin E), calendula officinalis extract*, chamomilla recutita (chamomile) flower extract*, melissa officinalis (balm mint) flower/leaf/stem extract, chrysanthemum sinense flower extract, humulus lupulus (hops) flower extract, magnolia biondii bud/flower extract, lonicera japonica (honeysuckle) flower extract, angelica archangelica root extract, foeniculum vulgare (fennel) seed extract.
* Organic
‡‡ Natural isolate blend sourced from essential oils

Notes:  Honeysuckle Rose by far had the most changes.  From a solely ingredient perspective the new additions and exclusions are not bad by any means.  Macadamia, Almond, and Argan oil are all high quality oils that are beneficial to the hair.  The only ingredients that were removed that may be detrimental to the product are Jojoba and Wheat Germ Oils.  Both of these oils are excellent for hair–jojoba is very similar to sebum and wheat germ oil is rich in ceramides.  Glycerin is now 1 spot higher on the ingredient list.  Lonicera caprifolium may have been removed from the product because of suspicions that it may have similar effects to synthetic parabens, however, it may still be in the product but under the catch all of “fragrance.”  None of the other ingredients removed appear to be for fragrance, so the scent of this product may have changed–or it was not properly listed before.   I have not tried the new formula and cannot speak for its quality, performance, or fragrance at this time.

Fragrance information (“isolate blend”) via Aubrey Organics:

“Natural fragrances are made up of a blend of essential oils, isolates from essential oils, and isolates created from bio-fermentation.

Essential oils: Blends of aroma molecules native to specific plants that are harvested via steam distillation. In this process, steam is passed through plant material, and during the cooling period, the steam and essential oil are separated.

Isolates: Specific aroma molecules found in essential oils and harvested via a process known as fractionated distillation. Essential oils are warmed, and as they cool, the individual isolates are separated out.

Isolates from bio-fermentation: Specific bacteria can produce the same aroma chemicals found in plants by using a unique process. These specific bacteria are introduced into a sugar solution, and as they interact with the solution, they form aroma chemicals that are then fractionated out and used in perfumery.

All three of these processes yield natural forms of aroma chemicals that, when blended together, create unique, natural designer fragrances. Our natural fragrance blends are certifiable to numerous natural and organic standards for personal care products worldwide.”

Glycogen Protein Balancing GPB Conditioner

GPB Conditioner New Packaging and Formula

Old Ingredients:

INGREDIENTS INCI: Aqua, cetyl alcohol, alcohol denat. (38b, lavender*), triticum vulgare (wheat) germ oil, aloe barbadensis leaf juice*, milk protein, fragrance‡‡, glycerin, brassica campestris/aleurites fordi oil copolymer, citrus grandis (grapefruit) extract, rosmarinus officinalis (rosemary) leaf oil*, salvia officinalis (sage) oil*, ascorbic acid, glycine soja (soybean) oil, glycoprotein, alcohol denat. (38b, lavender), tocopheryl acetate, alcohol, hamamelis virginiana (witch hazel) extract, beta-carotene, daucus carota sativa (carrot) root extract, equisetum hyemale extract, tocopherol, tussilago farfara (coltsfoot) leaf extract, urtica dioica (nettle) extract.
*Organic
‡‡Natural isolate blend sourced from essential oils

New Ingredients:

INGREDIENTS: Aqua, cetyl alcohol (from coconut), alcohol denat. (38b, lavender), aloe barbadensis leaf juice*, triticum vulgare (wheat) germ oil, fragrance‡‡, glycerin, milk protein, brassica campestris/aleurites fordi oil copolymer, citrus grandis (grapefruit) extract, salvia officinalis (sage) oil*, ascorbic acid (vitamin C), glycine soja oil‡, rosmarinus officinalis (rosemary) leaf oil*, ricinus communis (castor) oil, tocopherol (vitamin E), glycoprotein, beta-carotene‡, daucus carota sativa (carrot) root extract‡, equisetum hyemale (horsetail) extract, tussilago farfara (coltsfoot) leaf extract, urtica dioica (nettle) extract*.
*Organic
‡ Tested non-GMO
‡‡ Natural isolate blend sourced from essential oils

Notes:  The GPB Conditioner had the least amount of changes.  Alcohol denatured with organic lavender was removed, though alcohol denatured still remains in the product.  Tocopheryl acetate was replaced with a more stable form of vitamin E, tocopherol, while alcohol and witch hazel extract were removed.  Castor oil was added to this product.  Though the GPB Conditioner had the least amount of ingredient changes, how that will translate to product performance is unknown.  Wheat germ oil remained in this product but is now the 5th instead of 4th ingredient, and milk protein is now the 8th ingredient instead of 6th.  Fragrance moved slightly higher up the ingredient list, though it is just shy of the top 5 ingredients and is 6th on the list.   I have the old formula and it works fine, though it seems slightly different from the prior formula.  I have not tried the new formula and cannot speak for its quality, performance, or fragrance at this time.

Rosa Mosqueta® Nourishing Conditioner

Old (L) and New (R) Packaging and Formulas

Old Ingredients:

INGREDIENTS INCI: Aqua, cetyl alcohol, glycerin, alcohol denat. (38b, lavender*), rosa rubiginosa (Rosa Mosqueta®) seed oil*, hypericum perforatum (St. John’s wort) oil, triticum vulgare (wheat) germ oil, aloe barbadensis (aloe) leaf juice*, myroxylon pereirae (balsam Peru) oil, oenothera biennis (evening primrose) oil*, brassica campestris/aleurites fordi oil, rosmarinus officinalis (rosemary) leaf oil*, salvia officinalis (sage) leaf oil*, citrus grandis (grapefruit) extract, cysteine, methionine, tussilago farfara (coltsfoot) leaf extract, equisetum hyemale (horsetail) extract, tocopheryl acetate, foeniculum vulgare (fennel) fruit extract, humulus lupulus (hops) extract, melissa officinalis (balm mint) leaf extract, chamomilla recutita (matricaria) extract, glycine soja (soybean) oil, daucus carota sativa (carrot) root extract, beta-carotene, raphanus sativus (radish) root extract, hamamelis virginiana (witch hazel) water, ascorbic acid.

New Ingredients:

INGREDIENTS: Aqua, cetyl alcohol (from coconut), glycerin, rosa rubiginosa (Rosa Mosqueta®) seed oil*, alcohol denat. (38b, lavender), prunus amygdalus dulcis (sweet almond) oil*, fragrance‡‡, aloe barbadensis leaf juice*, oenothera biennis (evening primrose) oil*, brassica campestris/aleurites fordi oil copolymer, citrus grandis (grapefruit) extract, ascorbic acid (vitamin C), equisetum hyemale (horsetail) extract, tussilago farfara (coltsfoot) leaf extract, malus domestica (apple) fruit cell culture extract, calendula officinalis extract*, chamomilla recutita (chamomile) flower extract*, melissa officinalis (balm mint) flower/leaf/stem extract, foeniculum vulgare (fennel) seed extract, humulus lupulus (hops) flower extract, tocopherol (vitamin E), xanthan gum.
* Organic
‡‡ Natural isolate blend sourced from essential oils

Notes:  The Rosa Mosqueta Nourishing Conditioner also had a significant amount of changes.  Fragrance has been added to the product, though I suspect it includes the rosemary, sage, basalm Peru, and St. John’s wort oils.  Many of the common ingredients removed from the other products were removed here as well.  Alcohol denatured with organic lavender has been replaced with alcohol denatured with ‘regular’ lavender oil and is lower on the ingredient list, which is an improvement.    Sweet almond oil, apple fruit stem cells, calendula extract, and xanthum gum have been added.  I’m not sure what to make of apple fruit stem cells and do not know how this will alter the product.  Overall from an ingredient standpoint the formula did not get negative changes, but with the removal of wheat germ oil, you lose the benefits of ceramides on the hair, though sweet almond oil is also good for hair.  I have not tried the new formula and cannot speak for its quality, performance, or fragrance at this time.

White Camellia Ultra-Smoothing Conditioner

New Packaging and Formula

Old Ingredients (Not from Aubrey website):

Ingredients: Aqua, Aloe Barbadensis (Aloe) Leaf Juice, Myristyl Alcohol, Camellia Japonica Seed Oil, Triticum Vulgare (Wheat) Germ Oil, Alcohol Denat. (38B ,Lavender), Pelargonium Graveolens (Geranium) Flower Oil, Glycerin, Rosmarinus Officinalis (Rosemary) Leaf Oil, Citrus Grandis (Grapefruit) Extract, Salvia Officinalis (Sage) Oil, Tocopheryl Acetate, Foeniculum Vulgare (Fennel) Fruit Extract, Humulus Lupulus (Hops) Extract, Melissa Officinalis (Balm Mint) Leaf Extract, Chamomilla Recutita (Matricaria) Extract, Glycine Soja (Soybean) Oil, Daucus Carota Sativa (Carrot) Root Extract, Beta-Carotene, Hamamelis Virginiana (Witch Hazel) Water, Ascorbic Acid.

New Ingredients:

INGREDIENTS: Aqua, aloe barbadensis leaf juice*, myristyl alcohol (from coconut), camellia sinensis leaf oil*, argania spinosa (argan) nut oil*, macadamia ternifolia seed oil*, olea europaea (olive) fruit oil*, fragrance‡‡, alcohol denat. (38b, lavender), glycerin, citrus grandis (grapefruit) extract, ascorbic acid (vitamin C), rosmarinus officinalis (rosemary) leaf oil*, tocopherol (vitamin E), salvia officinalis (sage) oil*, calendula officinalis extract*, chamomilla recutita (chamomile) flower extract*, melissa officinalis (balm mint) flower/leaf/stem extract, humulus lupulus (hops) flower extract, foeniculum vulgare (fennel) seed extract.
* Organic
‡‡ Natural isolate blend sourced from essential oils

Notes: The reformulated White Camellia Ultra-Smoothing Conditioner has a “warm vanilla ginger” scent, which does not sound anything like what this product smelled like in the past–a strong floral scent. The addition of argan, macadamia, and olive oils should be beneficial to the product, despite the loss of ceramide rich wheat germ oil. Fragrance and alcohol denatured are 8th and 9th on the list, respectively, which is positive. Myristyl alcohol is a fatty alcohol and should not be drying.


SHAMPOOS

Honeysuckle Rose Moisturizing Shampoo

Old (L) and New (R) Packaging and Formulas

I have a bottle of shampoo from about 2011 and the ingredients are very different from the new ingredients and the ‘old’ (most recent before the full change) ingredients on the website.  How much of the disparity is because of the INCI format is uncertain.

NPAubreyO2011HSRSh
2011 Honeysuckle Rose Shampoo Ingredients

Old Ingredients:

Ingredients: Aloe barbadensis leaf juice*, decyl glucoside, oryza sativa (rice) extract*, glucose, xanthan gum, fragrance‡‡, sodium cocoyl hydrolyzed soy protein, citric acid, glycerin, rosa rubiginosa (Rosa Mosqueta®) seed oil*, prunus amygdalus dulcis (sweet almond) oil*, citrus grandis (grapefruit) extract, glucose oxidase, lactoperoxidase, ascorbic acid, macadamia ternifolia seed oil*, glyceryl linoleate, alcohol, alcohol denat. (38b, lavender), tocopheryl acetate, hamamelis virginiana (witch hazel) extract, glyceryl linolenate, glycine soja (soybean) oil, lonicera caprifolium (honeysuckle) flower extract, equisetum hyemale extract, tussilago farfara (coltsfoot) leaf extract, calendula officinalis extract*, chamomilla recutita (matricaria) flower extract*, melissa officinalis flower/leaf/stem extract, angelica archangelica root extract, beta-carotene, chrysanthemum sinense flower extract, daucus carota sativa (carrot) root extract, foeniculum vulgare (fennel) seed extract, humulus lupulus (hops) flower extract, magnolia biondii bud/flower extract, panax ginseng root extract, tocopherol.
*Organic
‡‡ Natural isolate blend sourced from essential oils

New Ingredients:

INGREDIENTS: Aqua, decyl glucoside‡ (from coconut/corn sugar), oryza sativa (rice) extract*, sodium cocoyl hydrolyzed soy protein§, aloe barbadensis leaf juice*, glucose, xanthan gum, fragrance‡‡, citric acid, rosa rubiginosa (Rosa Mosqueta®) seed oil*, glycerin, prunus amygdalus dulcis (sweet almond) oil*, argania spinosa (argan) nut oil*, citrus grandis (grapefruit) extract, glucose oxidase, lactoperoxidase, macadamia ternifolia seed oil*, tocopherol (vitamin E), ascorbic acid (vitamin C), linoleic acid (vitamin F), equisetum hyemale (horsetail) extract, tussilago farfara (coltsfoot) leaf extract, calendula officinalis extract*, chamomilla recutita (chamomile) flower extract*, melissa officinalis (balm mint) flower/leaf/stem extract, lonicera japonica (honeysuckle) flower extract, angelica archangelica root extract, chrysanthemum sinense flower extract, foeniculum vulgare (fennel) seed extract, humulus lupulus (hops) flower extract, linolenic acid (vitamin F), magnolia biondii bud/flower extract, panax ginseng root extract.
* Organic
§ Made with organic soy; non-GMO
‡ Tested non-GMO
‡‡ Natural isolate blend sourced from essential oils

Notes:  The ingredients removed should benefit the Honeysuckle Rose Moisturizing Shampoo, particularly the removal of alcohol and alcohol denatured.  Several of the ingredients removed in this product have been removed from the majority of Aubrey’s products, such as witch hazel extract, soybean oil, lonicera caprifolium (honeysuckle) flower extract, tocopheryl acetate, beta-carotene, and carrot root extract.  Argan Oil, lonicera japonica (honeysuckle) flower extract and Vitamin F have been added.  Vitamin F was in the 2011 formula.  Argan oil for conditioning, Vitamin F likely as a preservative, and lonicera japonica likely as a fragrant and preservative.  Fragrance is now the 8th ingredient as opposed to the 6th which is a slight improvement.  The coconut-corn oil soap listed on the pre-INCI bottle is likely composed of decyl glucoside and glucose.   I have not tried the new formula and cannot speak for its quality, performance, or fragrance at this time.

Glycogen Protein Balancing (GPB) Shampoo

New Packaging and Formula

Old Ingredients:

INGREDIENTS INCI: Aqua, aloe barbadensis leaf juice*, decyl glucoside, oryza sativa (rice) extract, glucose, sodium cocoyl hydrolyzed soy protein, xanthan gum, fragrance†, milk protein, butyrospermum parkii (shea) butter*, citric acid, oenothera biennis (evening primrose) oil*, simmondsia chinensis (jojoba) seed oil*, citrus grandis (grapefruit) extract, glycerin, rosmarinus officinalis (rosemary) leaf oil*, quillaja saponaria root extract, glucose oxidase, lactoperoxidase, ascorbic acid, alcohol denat. (38b, lavender*), tocopheryl acetate, hamamelis virginiana (witch hazel) extract, glycine soja (soybean) oil, beta-carotene, daucus carota sativa (carrot) root extract, tocopherol.

New Ingredients:

INGREDIENTS: Aqua, aloe barbadensis leaf juice*, decyl glucoside (from coconut/corn sugar), oryza sativa (rice) extract*, glucose, sodium cocoyl hydrolyzed soy protein§, fragrance‡‡, xanthan gum, milk protein, butyrospermum parkii (shea) butter*, citric acid, oenothera biennis (evening primrose) oil*, simmondsia chinensis (jojoba) seed oil*, rosmarinus officinalis (rosemary) leaf oil*, citrus grandis (grapefruit) extract, glycerin, quillaja saponaria root extract, ascorbic acid (vitamin C), glucose oxidase, lactoperoxidase, ricinus communis (castor) oil, tocopherol (vitamin E).
*Organic
§ Made from organic soy; non-GMO
‡ Tested non-GMO
‡‡ Natural isolate blend sourced from essential oils

Notes: The GPB Shampoo product also stayed relatively the same, but had the same aforementioned ingredients removed, and had castor oil added at the end of the ingredient list.   I have not tried either formula and cannot speak for its quality, performance, or fragrance at this time.

SUMMARY & CONCLUSION

The formulas for all of the above products and other products not listed here have changed.  Many of the ingredients stayed the same with argan oil, macadamia oil, sweet almond oil, lonicera japnoica (honeysuckle) flower extract, fragrance and tocopherol being consistent additions and witch hazel extract, soybean oil, lonicera caprifolium (honeysuckle) flower extract, tocopheryl acetate, beta-carotene, and carrot root extract being consistently removed. Though the changes are not bad based strictly on ingredients, it does not indicate if the changes will be beneficial or detrimental to the product.  Some of the more recent changes to the formulas (specifically Honeysuckle Rose) have caused the product not to perform as well as in the past in my opinion, though they are not bad in comparison to other products.  One of the biggest question marks is how fragrance is being listed on the product. Fragrance may be listed in that manner as a ‘trade secret,’ however, fragrance is listed very high in many of these conditioners.  Even if it is naturally derived, there are strict guidelines on essential oils and fragrance use.  More than likely the ingredients after fragrance are very low in concentration, therefore conditioners with oils listed after fragrance such as Honeysuckle Rose may not have the same moisturizing ability despite the shea butter.  I would consider buying the GPB conditioner again, but I am very hesitant about the Honeysuckle Rose conditioner until I hear overwhelmingly positive reviews.

 

Have you tried any of the new formulas yet?  Share your thoughts in the comments.  Thank you for reading!

Appreciating the 'Pulchritude' Of Nature Through Natural and Organic Beauty Products and Food.