Tag Archives: baby

Major Brand Must Pay $72 Million for Cancer Death Linked to Talcum Powder

This sad case is an example of a chronic exposure (exposed to something over a long span of time) and how it can be detrimental to health.  Many ingredients are not harmful in small doses (acute exposure) but if they accumulate in the body they can cause harm.  The claims against Johnson & Johnson are worrisome and bring to the forefront (again) deceptive practices companies use to benefit their sales–something that has been seen in other consumer product industries. 

Copyright Reuters

Johnson & Johnson was ordered by a Missouri state jury to pay $72 million of damages to the family of a woman whose death from ovarian cancer was linked to her use of the company’s talc-based Baby Powder and Shower to Shower for several decades.

In a verdict announced late Monday night, jurors in the circuit court of St. Louis awarded the family of Jacqueline Fox $10 million of actual damages and $62 million of punitive damages, according to the family’s lawyers and court records.

The verdict is the first by a U.S. jury to award damages over the claims, the lawyers said.

Johnson & Johnson faces claims that it, in an effort to boost sales, failed for decades to warn consumers that its talc-based products could cause cancer. About 1,000 cases have been filed in Missouri state court, and another 200 in New Jersey.

Fox, who lived in Birmingham, Alabama, claimed she used Baby Powder and Shower to Shower for feminine hygiene for more than 35 years before being diagnosed three years ago with ovarian cancer. She died in October at age 62.

Jurors found Johnson & Johnson liable for fraud, negligence and conspiracy, the family’s lawyers said. Deliberations lasted four hours, following a three-week trial.

Jere Beasley, a lawyer for Fox’s family, said Johnson & Johnson “knew as far back as the 1980s of the risk,” and yet resorted to “lying to the public, lying to the regulatory agencies.” He spoke on a conference call with journalists.

Carol Goodrich, a Johnson & Johnson spokeswoman, said: “We have no higher responsibility than the health and safety of consumers, and we are disappointed with the outcome of the trial. We sympathize with the plaintiff’s family but firmly believe the safety of cosmetic talc is supported by decades of scientific evidence.

Trials in several other talc lawsuits have been set for later this year, according to Danielle Mason, who also represented Fox’s family at trial.

In October 2013, a federal jury in Sioux Falls, South Dakota found that plaintiff Deane Berg’s use of Johnson & Johnson’s body powder products was a factor in her developing ovarian cancer. Nevertheless, it awarded no damages, court records show.

Valeant Pharmaceuticals International Inc now owns the Shower to Shower brand but was not a defendant in the Fox case.

The case is Hogans et al v. Johnson & Johnson et al, Circuit Court of the City of St. Louis, Missouri, No. 1422-CC09012.

(Reporting by Jonathan Stempel in New York. Additional reporting by Jessica Dye in New York; editing by Steve Orlofsky and Alan Crosby)

via Reuters http://news.yahoo.com/j-j-must-pay-72-million-cancer-death-154301727–finance.html;_ylt=AwrC0CZlGdZWpgkAzmzQtDMD;_ylu=X3oDMTByaWg0YW05BGNvbG8DYmYxBHBvcwM4BHZ0aWQDBHNlYwNzcg–

 

 

How to Read Cosmetic Ingredient Labels XXVIII

Baby, Baby, Baby.  They are often the most sensitive to the chemicals contained in cosmetics, therefore it is important to use the upmost caution when picking out bath and body products for an infant.  This product caught your eye because it is made by a brand you have used in the past, but they have introduced a ‘natural’ line that is free of all of the harmful chemicals their regular formula contains.  Whew, relief! Or is it?  Remember, I am teaching you Label Poise–how to walk the walk, talk the talk, and buy products that meet YOUR standards, whether natural, organic, or safe enough.  For instructions on Label Poise visit our Label Poise page.

The Label

LabelPoise28

The Ingredients

Water:  Safe!  Water is the ultimate moisturizer and is a key base in many products.

Decyl Glucoside:  Safe!  This ingredient is derived from the reaction of glucose from corn (GMO?) starch with decanol (fatty alcohol) of coconuts. Decyl Glucoside is a non-ionic surfactant that can be used as a foaming agent, emulsifier, or conditioner. It is biodegradable and is not known to be toxic, carcinogenic, mutagenic, or teratogenic (MSDS).

Polyglyceryl-10 Laurate:  Avoid!  Also known as dodecanoic acid, this ingredient is an ester of lauric acid and polyglycerin-10. It is used as an emulsifier, surfactant, and skin condition agent. There is very limited additional information about this ingredient. It is not known to be a skin or eye irritant, nor is it a sensitizer. No information on carcinogenicity, mutagenicity, or teratogenicity. This ingredient has not been reviewed by an expert panel. (MSDS)

Cocoglycerides:  Safe!   This ingredient is a non-ionic surfactant that can be used as a foaming agent, emulsifier, or conditioner.  It is typically derived from coconut oil, corn (GMO?), or fruit sugars, though it is dependent on the supplier.  The label of this product just says it was derived from a ‘vegetable’ source, which is likely one of the aforementioned.  This ingredient is biodegradable and is not known to be carcinogenic, mutagenic, or teratogenic.  In pure form Coco-Glucoside can be a skin irritant or cause inhalation irritation.  (MSDS; Review)

Sodium Coco-Sulfate:  Beware!  This ingredient is derived from various isolated fatty acids in coconut oil. This product is similar to/contains sodium lauryl sulfate, but contains other fatty acids such as capric, caprylic, oleic, and stearyl. Each fatty acid is reacted with sulfuric acid, then sodium carbonate, which produced sodium [fatty acid] sulfate. The term ‘coco’ is used to avoid using the individual name of each fatty acid that is derived from coconut oil. Though sodium coco sulfate contains sodium lauryl sulfate it is not believed to be as harsh, though it has similar concerns to sodium lauryl sulfate. This ingredient is a surfactant and is typically used in concentrations of 1-15% of the formula.  It is believed to be skin irritant and severe eye irritant, though it is not believed to be a carcinogen, skin sensitizer, or a cause of chronic toxicity.  (MSDS; MSDS; MSDS)

Coco-Glucoside:  Safe!  This ingredient is a non-ionic surfactant that can be used as a foaming agent, emulsifier, or conditioner. It is typically derived from coconut oil, corn (GMO?), or fruit sugars, though it is dependent on supplier. This ingredient is biodegradable and is not known to be carcinogenic, mutagenic, or teratogenic. In pure form Coco-Glucoside can be a skin irritant or cause inhalation irritation. (MSDS)

Glyceryl Oleate:  Safe!  This ingredient consists of oleic acid and glycerin both from vegetable sources as indicated on the bottle.  It is used as an emollient, emulsifier, and fragrance ingredient.  (MSDS)

Sodium Benzoate:  Beware!  This ingredient is the potassium salt of sorbic acid, which is likely synthetically derived though it is naturally occurring in some berry species.  It is widely used as a preservative in food, wine, and personal care products.  It is known to be a skin, eye, and lung irritant in pure form, though it is not generally considered to be a carcinogen, mutagen, or teratogen in humans, however, additional research suggests that is is mutagenic and genotoxic in human blood cells (in vitro).  It is typically not used in concentrations above 0.2%, so it should be fine in this product.  (MSDS)

Cetyl Hydroxyethylcellulose:  Avoid!  This ingredient is an ether of Cetyl Alcohol and Hydroxyethylcellulose. It is a thickening agent, and emulsion stabilizer. The concentration in this product is less than 1%, which may be line with the Cosmetic Ingredient Reviews use allowance of 0.008% to 0.3%. No MSDS found.

Xanthan Gum:  Safe!  This ingredient is a polysaccharide (carbohydrate consisting of sugar molecules) secreted by Xanthomonas campestris (a bacterium). It is not known to be carcinogenic, mutagenic, teratogenic, or cause developmental toxicity, though it can be an eye, skin, and lung irritant in pure form. There is a risk of long term biodegraded products being more toxic than pure Xanthan Gum. (MSDS)

Fragrance:  Beware!  Fragrances are often synthetic. Though they are low in concentration in the product, there is still a small chance of having an allergic reaction.

Citric Acid:  Safe!  This ingredient is naturally occurring in citrus fruits, but is typically produced by feeding sucrose or glucose to mold and additional chemical treatment.  It is used in cosmetics as a pH adjuster.  It is generally considered safe, though it is a skin and eye irritant in pure form. (MSDS)

Sodium Hydroxide:  Beware!  Also known as caustic soda or lye, this ingredient is likely used to aid surfactants or increase pH. In pure form it can be dangerous, toxic to eyes, lungs, and skin, though it is typically used in low concentrations in personal care products. (MSDS)

 

Nature’s Pulchritude’s Verdict:  This product is a vast improvement from the regular formula of this product.  However, this product is not necessarily ‘safe’ for babies, though a majority of the ingredients are supposedly naturally derived, and are rated as Safe!.  The two biggest concerns in the product are in the first 5 ingredients, which is not ideal.  Though it claims to be safe enough for newborns, the third ingredient in this product has little information available on it.  Polyglyceryl-10 Laurate  has not been reviewed by a cosmetic expert panel, which is quite troublesome.  Though an MSDS, the only one available,  did not indicate it was an irritant or sensitizer, there was no information on carcinogenicity, reproductive toxicity, endocrine disruption or mutagenicity.  Sodium Coco Sulfate is believed to be a severe eye irritant therefore it is quite questionable if this product is like “pure water” to eyes.  This product is definitely better than common baby washes, however, it is not without concerns.  It is on par with many of the other ‘natural’ baby products on the market.  It is best to err on the side of caution, however, this baby wash may be worth a try for toddler, use your best judgement for a newborn or infant.

How to Read Cosmetic Ingredient Labels XVI

Babies and young children are often most vulnerable to potentially dangerous chemicals in cosmetics. Are the products you use on your baby safe?   This baby shampoo is made by a company that is known for environmentally products, so you trust the product based on brand recognition.  Though many people base their shopping on brand recognition and reputation, this is not always a good idea.  Did you make the right choice by purchasing this product?  Remember, I am teaching you Label Poise–how to walk the walk, talk the talk, and buy products that meet YOUR standards, whether natural, organic, or safe enough.

The Label

LabelPoise16

The Ingredients

Aqua (Water):  Safe!  Water is the ultimate moisturizer and is a key ingredient in any moisturizing product.

Decyl Glucoside:  Safe!  This ingredient is derived from the reaction of glucose from corn starch (GMO?)  with decanol (fatty alcohol) of coconuts.  Decyl Glucoside is a non-ionic surfactant that can be used as a foaming agent, emulsifier, or conditioner.  It is biodegradable and is not known to be toxic, carcinogenic, mutagenic, or teratogenic (MSDS).

Sodium Coco Sulfate:  Avoid!/Beware! This ingredient is derived from various isolated fatty acids in coconut oil. This product is similar to/contains sodium lauryl sulfate, but contains other fatty acids such as capric, caprylic, oleic, and stearyl. Each fatty acid is reacted with sulfuric acid, then sodium carbonate, which produced sodium [fatty acid] sulfate. The term ‘coco’ is used to avoid using the individual name of each fatty acid that is derived from coconut oil. Though sodium coco sulfate contains sodium lauryl sulfate it is not believed to be as harsh, though it has similar concerns to sodium lauryl sulfate. This ingredient is a surfactant and is typically used in concentrations of 1-15% of the formula. There is no toxicological information on this ingredient, though it has the same concerns about skin and eye irritation as sodium lauryl sulfate. Given that babies have more sensitive skin than adults and there is no toxicity information on this ingredient, it is best to Avoid! for babies, and Beware! for adults. (MSDS)

Glycerin:  Safe!  Glycerin is a humectant that attracts moisture in the skin. Glycerine can be derived from fats and oils, or synthetically–which is not indicated here.  (MSDS)

Olive Leaf Extract:  Beware!  Olive Leaf extract is used for its skin conditioning, antioxidant, anti-inflamatory, and antimicrobial properties.  It is not known to be carcinogenic, mutagenic, teratogenic, or cause developmental toxicity.  This ingredient can be a skin, eye, lung, and digestive irritant in pure form (MSDS)

Aloe Vera Powder:  Safe!  This is the inner leaf of the aloe vera plant that has been processed into a powder form. Aloe gel from the inner leave is pasteurized and concentrated using low temperature evaporation. The product is then freeze dried to preserve freshness and alleviated the need for a preservative. Aloe vera powder is non-toxic, is not a carcinogen, and is not known to be a skin or eye irritant. Information on mutagenicity is not available. (MSDS; MSDS)

Magnesium Chloride: Safe!  Magnesium Chloride (MgCl2) is a natural inorganic salt that can be extracted from brine or sea water. It can be produced using various chemical reactions. It is used to increase viscosity of the water (aqueous) portion of a cosmetic formulation. Magnesium Chloride is generally considered safe by the FDA. In pure form it can be a skin irritant and targets the kidneys. It is typically used in low concentrations and should be of minimal concern. It is not known to be a carcinogen. (MSDS; MSDS)

Citric Acid:  Safe!  This ingredient is naturally occurring in citrus fruits, but is typically produced by feeding sucrose or glucose to mold and additional chemical treatment.  It is used in cosmetics as a pH adjuster.  It is generally considered safe, though it is a skin and eye irritant in pure form. (MSDS)

Essential Oils and Botanical Extracts:

      • Citrus Aurantium Dulcis (Orange) Peel Oil: Safe!  Orange Peel Oil is used as a skin conditioning agent and fragrant.
      • Citrus Grandis (Grapefruit) Peel Oil:  Safe!/ Beware!   Grapefruit Peel Oil is used as a skin conditioning agent and fragrant.  This ingredient has use restrictions in the EU, but should be fine for use in this product. (MSDS)
      • Citrus Nobilis (Mandarin Orange) Peel Oil:  Beware! Mandarin Orange Peel Oil is used as a skin conditioning agent and fragrant. This product should be avoided while pregnant, and likely is not safe for babies. Concentrations in this product are very low and are rinsed off, so exercise caution. (MSDS)

Sodium Benzoate and Potassium Sorbate:

      • Sodium Benzoate:  Safe!  This ingredient is the potassium salt of sorbic acid, which is likely synthetically derived though it is naturally occurring in some berry species.  It is widely used as a preservative in food, wine, and personal care products.  It is known to be a skin, eye, and lung irritant in pure form, though it is not generally considered to be a carcinogen, mutagen, or teratogen in humans, however, additional research suggests that is is mutagenic and genotoxic in human blood cells (in vitro).  It is typically not used in concentrations above 0.2%, so it should be fine in this product.  (MSDS)
      • Potassium Sorbate:  Safe!/Beware!  This ingredient is the sodium salt of benzoic acid, and is commonly used as a preservative in food and cosmetics.  This ingredient is typically synthetically derived.  The FDA mandates that this ingredient is not to exceed 0.1% of the formula by weight.  When combined with ascorbic acid (Vitamin C), sodium benzoate can react to form benzene, a known carcinogen–this product contains a form of Vitamin C.  These claims have been substantiated by the FDA, though the benzene levels are considered less than World Health Organization limits to be considered dangerous.  Sodium benzoate is not known to be carcinogenic, mutagenic, or neurotoxic, though it can be teratogenic in embryos and fetuses.  This ingredient may cause skin and eye irritation in pure form.  (MSDS)

Tetrasodium Iminodisccinate:  Avoid!  This ingredient is a chealator that binds to mineral deposits and soap scum to prevent them from depositing on skin and allows them to be rinsed away. No MSDS found.

 

 

Nature’s Pulchritude’s Verdict: This product looked promising at first glance.  The only ingredients that were questionable were Magnesium Chloride and Tetrasodium Iminodisuccinate.  In actuality, Sodium Coco Sulfate was an unsuspecting concern.  This product is far better than the commonly found baby products, though it still has questionable ingredients. Sodium Coco Sulfate is a key example of deceptive marketing.  The word ‘coco’ leads many consumers to believe that the ingredient is naturally (coconut) derived and therefore safe.  Sodium Coco Sulfate and Tetrasodium Iminodisuccinate are both rated Avoid! because of lack of information, though they may not be hazardous.  Essential Oils can also be of minor concern, though they should be okay for use in this product given it is to be rinsed off, and is likely in low concentrations.  Err on the side of caution and skip this product unless your only other options are ‘conventional’ baby products.

 

Would you purchase this product?  Tell us in the comments!

Thank you for reading!

How to Read Cosmetic Ingredient Labels V

Today we’re in the store to buy another baby shampoo that you just finished.  You pick up a product by the go-to brand for baby products–they must know what they are doing, right?   There are several different options and you pick up the product with Cocoa and Shea Butters.  You start using your Label Poise and notice the product has a lot of chemicals you should ‘Beware!‘ and ‘Avoid!‘.  Remember, I am teaching you Label Poise–how to walk the walk, talk the talk, and buy products that meet YOUR standards, whether natural, organic, or safe enough.

Here are the tips I gave you in my first three posts on how to read ingredient labels:

  1. Ingredients are listed by quantity in the formula, from greatest to least, based on standards by the Federal Trade Commission (FTC).
  2. Ingredients are listed using the International Nomenclature of Cosmetics Ingredients (INCI), therefore they are listed using scientific nomenclature, or    binomial nomenclature (latin; taxonomy) for ingredients derived from plants.
  3. How ingredients are derived is seldom listed on the label (the same chemical can be derived synthetically or naturally).
  4. Fragrances are generically listed because they are considered trade secrets; typically naturally derived fragrances do not use “Fragrance (Parfum)” but a specific naming system.
  5. If it looks like a “chemical” it probably is, if you don’t want chemicals don’t buy it!  **Everything is a chemical, I’m referring to ‘bad’ chemicals here

The Label:

LabelPoise5

The Ingredients:

Water:  Safe!

Cocamidopropyl Betaine:  Beware!  This ingredient is a synthetic surfactant derived from coconut oil and dimethylamonipropylamine.  This ingredient can be a skin allergen and irritant and was voted Allergen of the Year in 2004 by the American Contact Dermatitis Society.  It is also an eye and lung irritant, though it is not known to be carcinogenic or mutagenic. (MSDS)

PEG-80 Sorbitan Laurate:  Beware!  PEG-80 Sorbitan Laurate is used as an emulsifier, mild solvent, and mild surfactant, which helps water combine with oil and dirt to be cleansed.  This ingredient is considered safe to use in cosmetics, however it is derived from polyethylene glycol, which may be contaminated with carcinogens 1,4-dioxane (1 ppt), formaldehyde (2.5 ppm), ethylene oxide (1 ppm), and acetaldehyde (3 ppt).  (MSDS)

Sodium Trideceth Sulfate:  Beware!/Avoid!  This ingredient is a surfactant.  Very limited information available.

Acrylates Copolymer:  Beware!  This ingredient is used as a binding, film forming, and antistatic agent.  It can be found in a variety of products including nail polish, hair sprays, sunscreen and mascara.  It is not known to be carcinogenic or mutagenic, thought it may be a skin or eye irritant. (MSDS)

Phenoxyethanol:  Avoid!  This is a preservative.  You will notice it is very high on the list of ingredients.  The FDA released a warning about how it can impact the central nervous system and induce vomiting in infants.  Interesting isn’t it?  it is commonly used because it is safer than formaldehyde-releasing preservatives.  It is also suspected to be a xenoestrogen (mimics estrogen), a cause of contact dermatitis and skin irritant.  I am not sure what concentration is in this product, but it is banned in the EU and Japan in concentrations over 1%.  Therefore, one would assume it is either greater than the EU concentration restraint or it is in accordance, and all the Shea & Coco Butters that are used to market this product are at very low concentrations.  This ingredient is made from 2 carcinogens (benzene and ethylene oxide), though it itself is not known to be carcinogenic.

Glycol Distearate:  Avoid!  This ingredient is used as an emollient.  It is the diester of ethylene glycol and stearic acid.  It is typically used in concentrations of 0.5 – 4%.  There is no data available about hazards, carcinogenicity, or mutagenicity. (MSDS)

Glycerin:  Safe!  Glycerin is a humectant that attracts moisture in the hair, if you are ‘glycerin sensitive’ avoid this product.  Glycerine can be derived from fats and oils or synthetically.

Fragrance:  Beware!  Fragrances are often synthetic. They are in moderate concentration in this product, so there may be a greater chance of having an allergic reaction.

Lauryl Methyl Gluceth-10 Hydroxypropyldimonium Chloride:  Avoid!  This ingredient is an ammonium salt used for its humectant and antistatic qualities.  There is no available information available on this ingredient.

Laureth-4:  Beware!  This is a synthetic polymer of lauryl alcohol and polyethylene glycol (PEG).  It is used as surfactant, antistatic agent, emulsifier, and masker.  This ingredient is typically used in concentrations of 1-5%.  It has low toxicity, is not mutagenic is lab animals. (PubChem)

Methylparaben:  Beware!  This ingredient is synthetic and acts as a preservative with anti-fungal properties.  It is naturally occurring in fruits such as blueberries as p-hydroxybenzoic acid.  This ingredient is readily absorbed into skin and it along with other parabens have been at the center of controversy about its role in causing cancerous cells in breast tissue being that parabens are xenoestrogens (mimic estrogen).  There is not conclusive proof that states that use of personal care products containing parabens causes cancer.  Methylparaben is suspected to cause DNA damage and increased skin aging when it reacts to UVB rays.

Sodium Hydroxide:  Beware!  Also known as caustic soda or lye, this ingredient is likely used to aid surfactants or increase pH.  In pure form it can be dangerous, toxic to eyes, lungs, and skin, though it is typically used in low concentrations in personal care products. (MSDS)

Propylparaben:  Beware!  Propylparaben is used as an anti-fungal preservative, typically in concentrations less than 1%.  It is commonly synthetically produced though it is produced naturally in fruits as p-hydroxybenzoic acid.  It is readily absorbed into the skin and metabolized, and has been found in urine in limited tests.  This ingredient is readily absorbed into skin and it along with other parabens have been at the center of controversy about its role in causing cancerous cells in breast tissue being that parabens are xenoestrogens (mimic estrogen).  There is not conclusive proof that demonstrates that use of personal care products containing parabens causes cancer.

Tetrasodium EDTA:  Beware!/Avoid!  EDTA is an abbreviation for Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid.  This ingredient is used as a chelating agent to sequester metal ions and causes them to lose the ability of reacting with other ingredients.  It is also used as a preservative.  It can improve lather and decrease incidence of soap scum.  Tetrasodium EDTA is a penetration enhancer and suspected to be toxic to the upper respiratory tract, skin, and eyes. Target organs are the kidneys and bladder.  This ingredient is toxic to the environment and is a suspected persistent organic pollutant (POP) by the EU.  (MSDS; MSDS)

Mineral Oil:  Beware!  This is a petrochemical typically derived from crude oil.  It can be found in high concentrations (One of the first 5 ingredients, more on this later) in a variety of products.  Mineral Oil prevents moisture from entering or leaving the skin.

Theobroma Cacao (Cocoa) Seed Butter:  Safe!  Derived from the seeds of the Cacao pod, it is used for its emollient and moisturizing properties.

Butyrospermum Parkii (Shea) Butter:  Safe!  This ingredient is derived from the nut of the Shea Tree and is used for its moisturizing properties.

Tocopheryl Acetate:  Safe!/Beware!  Tocopheryl Acetate, a form of Vitamin E, is has antioxidant properties and can penetrate skin cells.  It is generally regarded as safe however I saw some information (not on a MSDS) linking it to cancer so use your best discretion.

Aloe Barbadensis Leaf Juice:  Safe!  This ingredient is used for its nutrient content and moisturizing properties.

Yellow 10:  Beware!  This ingredient is typically derived from petroleum or coal tar.  It may be contaminated with carcinogens associated with petroleum. Its use is approved by the FDA, there is not information available on teratogenicity, carcinogenicity, mutagenicity, or developmental toxicity, though it is a skin, eye, and inhalation hazard and irritant. (MSDS)

Red 40:  Beware!  Also known as Allura Red AC, CI16035, FD&C Red 40, this ingredient is a synthetic dye used in food and cosmetics.  It is not recommended for use for consumption of children due to a study linking it and other synthetic dyes to hyperactivity and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.  It is considered safe by the FDA and EU (individual countries have banned its use).  It is not known to be (no data) carcinogenic, teratogenic, or mutagenic, though it is a slight skin, eye, and lung irritant in pure form. (MSDS).

Nature’s Pulchritude Verdict:  Four of the first five ingredients are potentially hazardous.  This is a baby product that has an ingredient fairly high on the ingredient list that can impact the central nervous system and induce vomiting in infants, a warning that was issued by the FDA.  Need I say more?  This product looks worse than some shampoos used on adults.  Additionally, this product is marketed using the moisturizing factors of Cocoa and Shea Butters, being that babies lose moisture in their skin quickly.  Remember what I mentioned about ingredient list and quantity (Tip #1)?  The Cocoa and Shea Butters are 4th and 5th from the bottom, it is unlikely they are providing much “moisture.”  It is also questionable that several of the ingredients in this product had no available information, they could be harmless but they may also be harmful and that is not a change you would want to take with a baby.  On another note, the makers of this product have released a “naturals” version of their baby products, check back in a few weeks to see if it is really a better product.