Tag Archives: hair

Review: Oyin Handmade Honey Hemp Conditioner

Oyin Handmade Honey Hemp Conditioner

This product was purchased by Nature’s Pulchritude. All opinions are that of Nature’s Pulchritude and have not be influenced in any way, shape, or form.

“Oh, Honey. It’s a natural humectant… nature’s gift for glowing, supple hair. Ah, Hemp Oil. With an incredibly rich array of Fatty Acids to ensure well-nourished tresses. Oh! Ah! Oyin’s Honey-Hemp Conditioner! How could it possibly be improved? Perhaps by adding just the smallest touch of Silk Protein and a generous dollop of Aloe Vera Gel… just to take the succulence over the top. ;o)”

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I first started using this product about 4-5 years ago. I wanted to try the products for a few month and eventually got my hands on their ‘snack pack.’ I have since purchased 2 of the 33 ounce bottles. This product was pivotal on my natural hair “journey” and has been a staple. I use this conditioner both as a rinse out and deep conditioner, and have also experimented with using it as a leave-in. It is a fantastic moisturizer and leaves my hair feeling like silk!

Product

This is a fantastic conditioner. Great ingredients, great quality all around. This product does what it claims. The 33 ounce bottle is very convenient because it has a pump. A little goes a long way. 1 33 ounce bottle last me about a year with minimum biweekly use. It has a moderately thick consistency–not runny, not stiffly thick, just right and easily spreadable.

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Scent

Sweet Citrus. That is the best way to describe how Honey Hemp conditioner smells. It smells really, really, really good. Depending on the products you use after conditioning the faint scent of the product will linger in your hair.

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Moisture

Nourish and Moisture. Check, Check. This product does a great job moisturizing my hair. It works well as a rinse out, but works better as a deep conditioner. 30 minutes underneath a hooded dryer is enough. The moisturized feeling is not from a heavy silicones, waxes, etc. but from true moisturization! My hair feels moisturized after completely rinsing the product out of my hair. [Author’s Note: My hair type is predominately 4a, normal porosity, moderate density]

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Detangling

I typically don’t use this product to detangle but it does work well for detangling. My hair is so well moisturized it does not re-tangle at all after detangling, which makes styling much easier.

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EnviroFactor
Ingredients: Purified Water, Organic Aloe Vera Gel, Behentremonium Methosulfate (and) Cetearyl Alcohol (emulsifier derived from colza oil), Honey, Virgin Hemp Oil, Coconut Oil, Vegetable Glycerine, Hydrolized Silk, Citrus Essences, Fragrance, Optiphen (preservative), and LOVE!

The only questionable ingredient in this product is optiphen, which is a mixture of Phenoxyethanol and Caprylyl Glycol. Phenoxyethanol is widely used in natural products and prompted my series “Preservatives in Natural Products.” I don’t think this ingredient is cause for concern, but I’d still like more unbiased peer reviewed studies to fully deem this ingredient Safe!

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4.85/5 Globes

Nature’s Pulchritude All-Star!

Highly recommended!

Have you tried this product? What did you think?

Sundial Brands Announce Strategic Partnership to Drive Its Purpose-Driven Entrepreneurship

A well known beauty brand that produces quality products with fair trade and certified organics products via SheaMoisture and Nubian Heritage recently announced an investment partnership that has been met with controversy. Check back tomorrow for my take on this partnership and why you should or should not be concerned!

Copyright Sundial Brands LLC (No Copyright Infringement Intended)

New York – (September 2, 2015) – Sundial Brands, the natural skin care and hair care manufacturer widely recognized for introducing the New General Market concept to beauty and retail, today announced that it has signed an agreement to enter into a strategic partnership with Bain Capital Private Equity, a leading global investment firm, to accelerate the company’s growth. Sundial founder and CEO Richelieu Dennis will continue to provide vision and leadership for the company, which will remain majority family-owned and operated including board, management and day-to-day operationsThe partnership will drive Sundial’s social entrepreneurship model, accelerate its multi-brand portfolio strategy – including investments in community-minded entrepreneurs and brands – and advance its transformative approach to serving New General Market consumers. It also ensures that Sundial’s community of consumers will remain at the forefront of the beauty landscape. Financial terms of the minority investment were not disclosed.

Copyright Sundial Brands LLC (No Copyright Infringement Intended)

“Our love of people has always been our motivation and our competitive advantage,” said Dennis. “While we have been presented several opportunities to be acquired by multinational corporations, we are most excited that our collaboration with Bain Capital fulfills our commitment to remain an independent family-owned and operated company with a purpose-driven business model that puts community at our core. Our consumers have always been partners with us, and now they can continue to walk with us on this journey. We recognize that African-American women have long been at the forefront of the natural hair and body movement that has created the dynamic cultural shift that we see today. It is exciting for us to see how Naturalistas have now empowered women from all backgrounds to embrace their natural beauty. In addition, they have compelled multinational beauty brands and retailers to acknowledge and be more respectful of their needs. Our family has understood this since 1912 – the value of listening to underserved consumers and delivering on their unmet needs. We are moving forward to build Sundial into a global family-owned-and-operated consumer brand of which they can be even more proud.”

“We are also excited to welcome Bain Capital as a valuable partner who shares our commitment to our communities globally and understands how our brand of social entrepreneurism can be enhanced to achieve our vision for growth and impact,” Dennis added.  “Sundial is now in the strongest position to continue to lead this beauty revolution, alongside all of our consumers, so that no one gets left behind.” Deval Patrick, a Managing Director at Bain Capital and the former Governor of Massachusetts, played an active role in the partnership discussions and will join the Board of Directors of Sundial.

Copyright Sundial Brands LLC (No Copyright Infringement Intended)

In 1992, Dennis founded Sundial with his college roommate, Nyema Tubman, and his mother, Mary Dennis, shortly after graduating from Babson College and being unable to return to his home country of Liberia because of civil war.  With a passion for entrepreneurship and a vision to fill unmet consumer needs, Dennis decided to pursue a bold concept: address skin and hair care issues traditionally ignored by mass market companies.  Drawing from culturally-authentic traditions born out of his family’s roots in Africa and passed down to him from his grandmother, Dennis incorporated four generations of recipes, wisdom and global experiences into efficacious natural bath and body care products.  In two short decades, Sundial has grown from selling products on the streets of New York City to having distribution and co-creation of its flagship brands – SheaMoisture and Nubian Heritage – with major retailers across the United States. Via its purpose-driven Community Commerce business model, the company creates opportunities for sustainable social and economic empowerment throughout its supply chain and communities in the U.S. and Africa, focusing on entrepreneurship, women’s empowerment, education and wellness.

“We are strategically aligned with our new partner around the elevation of the New General Market as a key growth driver and the opportunity to identify and invest in new ways to better serve our consumer community,” said Dennis.  “We have defined the New General Market as ‘an amalgamation of cultures, ethnicities and demographics aligned against commonalities, need states and lifestyles.’  Most critical are the commonalities and employing multi-need strategies that acknowledge both the differences within populations and the similarities across populations.  We all share similar needs that are often unmet or under-served.  When we focus on those, we can provide solutions that serve everyone in much more meaningful, relevant ways.”

Bain Capital Private Equity has a long track record of investing in and partnering with management teams to help grow companies.  Some of its consumer and retail investments have included TOMS, Canada Goose and Bright Horizons Family Solutions.

“Richelieu and his family have built an amazing business and community centered on the idea of the New General Market, an idea that is very well aligned with where we as consumers and as a country are headed. We could not be more excited to partner with Sundial Brands to continue to enhance this differentiated approach to innovation, social entrepreneurship and community engagement,” said Ryan Cotton, a Managing Director at Bain Capital.

 

Product Review: Radha Argan Oil

These items were provided by Radha Beauty for review. All opinions are that of Nature’s Pulchritude and have not be influenced in any way, shape, or form.

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Product Details

Consistency: Liquid
Color: Yellow
Scent: None
Environmentally Friendly?: Yes, Recyclable Glass Container.
Animal Testing?: No.

Product

This is a really great oil!  It is slightly more viscous than olive oil and has no smell.  It absorbs well into hair.

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Functionality

This product can be used for hair or skin.  I used this product on the ends of my hair and have already seen a reduction in split and broken ends!  Amazing!

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EnviroFactor

This product is only 1 ingredient, pure Argan Oil!  The bottle of this product says “100% organic” but it does not have a seal of the organization that certified it.  Being that the argan oil is imported from Morocco, it is possible it was certified there, thus not having the USDA seal.

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2.8/3 Globes

Overall, this is an excellent product and will most definitely be a staple in my hair regimen!  I will see how it does on skin and will update this post!

Product Review: Dr. Braggs Apple Cider Vinegar

This product was purchased by Nature’s Pulchritude.  All opinions are that of Nature’s Pulchritude and have not be influenced in any way, shape, or form.

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Dr. Braggs Raw Organic Apple Cider Vinegar is a truly versatile ‘jack of all trades’ product.  I have used this product in a variety of ways for over 5 years.  I use it as a rinse in my hair, diluted as a facial toner, to ‘sanitize’ and tenderize poultry, added to a facial mask, and as a drink to help with a cold.  Not only it is multi-functional it works VERY WELL each way!

Product Details:

Consistency:  Liquid
Color:  Amber
Scent:  Vinegar
Organic Ingredients: Raw, Unfiltered Apple Cider Vinegar
Environmental Friendly?: Yes.  Recyclable Container (Glass)

Product

This is a very high quality product.  It is quite strong and potent in scent, and is cloudy due to it being unfiltered.

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Functionality

Skin, Hair, Food.  This product can be used for ‘all of the above’ and is very effective on each.  The acidity (pH of ~4) of the apple cider vinegar works as a hair rinse to provide shine and close any open cuticles.  On skin it helps to draw out impurities and decrease oil and bacteria, as well as reduce the appearance of pores.  It works well on poultry, there is no research to support that it kills bacteria on meat but it seems to make the meat tender and more moist after cooking.  Apple cider vinegar is also great for thinning mucus in the sinuses and especially in your throat when sick.

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EnviroFactor

This product is only one ingredient, raw unfiltered apple cider vinegar that is certified organic and non-GMO project verified.

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3 Globes  Nature’s Pulchritude MVP!

Raw ACV is a staple for me!  It is a great item to just have on hand even if you are not using it on a weekly basis.  It can be used in so many ways and does a fabulous job in each use!

Have you tried Raw Apple Cider Vinegar?  How to you use it? 

How to Read Cosmetic Ingredient Labels XLII

Remember, I am teaching you Label Poise–how to walk the walk, talk the talk, and buy products that meet YOUR standards, whether natural, organic, or safe enough.  For instructions on Label Poise visit our Label Poise page.

The Label

The Ingredients

Aqua (Water): Safe!  Water is the ultimate moisturizer and is a key ingredient in many moisturizing products.

Glycerin: Safe!  Glycerin is a humectant that attracts moisture in the skin. Glycerine can be derived from fats and oils, or synthetically–which is not indicated here.  (MSDS)

Propylene Glycol: Beware!  Propylene Glycol aka PPG is used as a penetration enhancer, humectant, and stabilizes the product despite temperature changes. This ingredient is not believed to be carcinogenic or a developmental toxin, though it may be contaminated with impurities such as Ethylene Oxide and 1,4-dioxane which are carcinogens. It is a suspected mutagen and teratogen. It is believed to be a skin irritant. In pure form it can be toxic to the central nervous system and may cause target organ damage (lungs and kidneys) with prolonged or repeated exposure. This ingredient is low on this list and should only be a low-moderate concern.  (MSDS)

PPG-5-Ceteth-20: This ingredient is a polyoxypropylene, polyoxyethylene ether of cetyl alcohol and is used as a surfactant and emollient. PPG-5-Ceteth-20 is typically used in concentrations of 0.05-10% in leave-on products and 0.5-9% in rinse-off products. The primarily concern of this ingredient is contamination with Ethylene Oxide, a suspected carcinogen, and 1,4-dioxane, a known carcinogen. It was not found to be a skin or eye irritant in tests performed by the Cosmetic Ingredient Review (CIR). There is limited additional information available about this ingredient, it is not known to be a carcinogen. (MSDS)

PEG-12 Dimethicone: Beware!   This ingredient is 12 molecule polyethylene glycol combined with dimethicone, making it a silicone-based polymer.  It can also be described as an ethoxylated polymidethylsilocane.  It is used to improve spreadability and create a smooth feeling.  It is typically used in concentrations of 0.5-3%.  It can be a skin and eye irritant in pure form.  This ingredient, along with various other ethoxylated chemicals and PEGs, may be contaminated with carcinogenic chemicals such as 1,4-dioxane and Ethylene oxide, as well as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). (MSDS; MSDS; MSDS; CIR)

Honey Extract: This ingredient is an extract of honey and is used for its antiseptic, skin moisturizing, and soothing properties. No toxicological information available. (MSDS) safe/beware

Aloe Barbadensis Leaf Juice: Safe!  This ingredient is used for its nutrient content and moisturizing properties.

Hydrolyzed Wheat Protein: Safe!  This ingredient is naturally derived and contains wheat oligosaccharides (carbohydrates) and acts as a moisturizer and film former to nourish skin (or hair). It is not known to be a carcinogen or mutagen, though it can cause eye and dermal irritation in pure form.  Avoid! if you have a gluten allergy. (MSDS)

Panthenol: Safe!  This ingredient is a provitamin of B5.  Panthenol is an alcohol analog of Vitamin B5 (pantothenic acid).  It is used as an anti-static and conditioning agent.  It can be derived from plants or animals therefore it may not be vegan friendly. There is debate about what benefits panthenol can actually provide to hair as a vitamin being that hair is not living.  Panthenol is a mild skin and eye irritant in pure form, though there is no information on carcinogenicity, teratogenicity, mutagenicity, or developmental toxicity.  It is low on the list of ingredients and should not be a concern.  (MSDS; MSDS)

Camellia Sinensis (Green Tea) Extract:  Beware! Green Tea extract is used for its antioxidant, antimicrobial, astringent, emollient, skin conditioning, uv absorption, and humectant properites. It is typically used in concentrations not exceeding 2% in leave-on products, and 1% in rinse-off products and are considered safe for use in cosmetics when formulated to be non sensitizing. Green Tea Extract is a slight skin, eye, and lung irritant in pure form.  No information on developmental, reproductive, or teratogenic toxicity available. (MSDS;CIR)

Amodimethicone: Beware!/Avoid!  This ingredient is a derivative of silica and is used as an anti-static film forming agent.  Silicone polymers typically are not toxic though they are not the best ingredients for hair due to their film forming properties which prevent moisture from entering the hair shaft.  No toxicological data available. (MSDS)

Trideceth-12: Beware!/Avoid! This ingredient is an ether of polyethylene glycol and tridecyl alcohol, a long chain fatty alcohol, with 12 units of ethylene oxide, a suspected carcinogen. Tricedeth-12 is primarily used as a surfactant that reduces the buildup of silicones (a silicone is the 5th ingredient). This ingredient has a low molecular weight and show not be used an broken or irritated skin or scalp as it has the ability to absorb through the skin. 1,4-dioxane, a carcinogen, is often a byproduct of the reaction used to make this ingredient (ethyloxylation), and therefore may be present in low levels. This ingredient is deemed safe by the Cosmetic Ingredient Review when formulated to be nonirritating and in current use concentrations, however, there is limited information about this ingredient and no MSDS available, therefore it is rated AVOID as a precaution.

Cetrimonium Chloride: Beware!  Cetrimonium Chloride is a positively charged quaternary ammonium salt. It is used as a conditioning agent and softener, it also improves wet and dry combing of hair. It is also listed as a topical antiseptic and preservative. It is listed as a skin irritant and allergen in a small portion of individuals; it is not a carcinogen (MSDS;MSDS).

Hydroxyethylcellulose: Safe!/Beware!  This ingredient is a modified celluose polymer. Hydroxyethylcellulose is primarily used as a binder, viscosity controlling agent (aqueous), emulsion stabilizer, and film forming agent. It is typically used in concentrations of 0.1 – 3% by weight of the formula. It can be a mild skin or eye irritant in pure form, though it is not known to be carcinogenic. (MSDS;MSDS)

Acrylamidopropyltrimonium Chloride/Acrylamide Copolymer: Avoid! This ingredient is used as a film former and anti-static agent. It is typically used in concentrations of 0.1 to 0.25% by weight of a formula. No MSDS found.

Dehydroacetic Acid: Safe! This ingredient is a preservative used for its fungicide and bactericide properties. Dehydroacetic acid is a sodium salt of sodium dehydroacetate. It is suggested to be used in concentrations of no more than 0.6%. It can be a skin, eye, and lung irritant, and can be toxic to kidneys, liver, and central nervous system in pure form. It is not believed to be carcinogenic or mutagenic. (MSDS)

Benzyl Alcohol:  Beware!  This ingredient is made naturally by many plants or can be synthetically derived. It is typically used as a preservative and based on its placement on the list is in low concentration. Benzyl Alcohol is not known to be a carcinogen or teratogen, though it is a mutagen in bacteria and yeast, and may be toxic to the liver and central nervous system in pure form. Benzyl Alcohol can be slightly hazardous with skin contact, but due to its concentration it should be okay. (MSDS)

Parfum (Fragrance): Beware!  Fragrances are often synthetic. Though they are low in concentration in the product, there is still a small chance of having an allergic reaction.

Amyl Cinnamic Alcohol: Beware!  Also known as alpha-amyl cinnamic alcohol or amylcinnamyl Alcohol, this incredient is a water insoluble synthetic fragrance. The used of Amyl Cinnamic Alcohol is restricted by the International Fragrance Association because this ingredient is a possible skin sensitizer. It is not known to be carcinogenic, though it is a possible eye irritant. (MSDS)

Lilial: Avoid! Also known as lily aldehyde or butylphenyl methylpropional, this ingredient is a synthetic fragrance ingredient. It is a suspected cause of contact dermatitis in certain individuals and is a suspected immune system toxicant. The use of lilial is restricted in the European Union and must be labeled if used in concentrations greater than 0.001% in leave-on products and 0.01 in rinse off products. No MSDS found.

Linalool: Safe!/Beware!  This ingredient is used as a fragrance and is banned in rinse off products above a concentration of 0.01% (or 0.001% in leave-on products).  It is naturally occurring in various plants and spices, though it may also be made synthetically.  It is considered a skin irritant (causing eczema) and allergen, though pure linalool can have anti-cancer properties.  Given that the concentration is likely quite low it should be fine unless you are allergic to it.

CI 15985 (Yellow #6): Beware!  This is a synthetic yellow dye (food coloring) also known as FD&C Yellow 6 or Sunset Yellow FCF.  This dye in manufactured from the aromatic hydrocarbons of petroleum.  It is not known to be toxic and there are low instances of allergic reaction (aspirin intolerant should avoid this ingredient).  There is no data on mutagenicity, teratogenicity, developmental toxicity, or carcinogenicity.  (MSDS)

CI 140700 (Red #4): Beware!  / Avoid! This is a red pigment also known as Carmine, or C.I. 75470 (Author’s Note: this ingredient appears to be labeled incorrectly. “CI 140700” only yields results for the products it is found in).  Red #4 is obtained from the aluminum salt of carminic acid. This ingredient is toxic to blood, kidneys, bladder, glands, and gastrointestinal tract in pure form.  There is no data on mutagenicity, teratogenicity, developmental toxicity. It is not known to be carcinogenic to humans (IARC Group 3).  (MSDS)

CI 17299 (Red #3): Beware!  / Avoid! This is a red pigment also known as Erythrosine, or E127 (Author’s Note: this ingredient appears to be labeled incorrectly.).  Red #e is organoioine compound derived from fluorone. This ingredient is toxic to nervous system, mucuous membranes, and lungs in pure form, and is a skin, eye, and lung irritant .  There is no data on mutagenicity, teratogenicity, developmental toxicity. It is not known to be carcinogenic to humans (IARC Group 3).  (MSDS)

The Allergens in Natural Beauty Products

It is very important to acknowledge that everything is a chemical.  Despite a product being all natural and/or organic the chemicals in the products you use can illicit an allergic or sensitizing reaction.  This is also why it is important to pay attention to the ingredients in your products and your skins reaction to aid in finding products that work for you or common ingredients in your products that may be causing a negative reaction.

Please note that all essential oils and fragrances have use restrictions.

By Rebecca Guenard–When Sara ordered a zucchini, goat cheese, and broad-bean salad, she had no way of knowing it would almost cost her life. As her airway began to swell after two bites, a shot of adrenaline was the only thing that could save her.  Sara was 55 years old at the time and had never had an allergic reaction to goat cheese. A few months before her anaphylaxis she had stopped using a natural moisturizer made with goat’s milk because instead of helping, it only exacerbated her itchy, dry skin.  But worse than that, the organic beauty cream ended up putting her in the emergency room.

Sara had a hidden allergy to a compound in goat’s milk.  The daily moisturizer she applied built up enough antibodies to cause the flood of immune response she experienced the day she ingested a massive dose of the compound.

Natural beauty products like the one Sara opted for have become very popular: Due in part to the cosmetics market, revenue from essential oils is expected to total $1.5 billion by 2018.  And marketing language is often designed to entice consumers by imbuing natural ingredients with wondrous properties–the liquid soap in my bathroom encourages me to experience the soothing fragrance of lavender and chamomile as it “works its magic” on my hands. But as Sara’s case demonstrates, “natural” doesn’t always mean “worry-free.”

“A lot of people think if you buy a natural product then you are not going to have any allergies to it. No, that’s not what natural means,” says Dr. Cindy Jones, a biochemist and natural-beauty formulator. In fact, two of the most reputedly benign ingredients—the magic-makers chamomile and lavender—are known allergens.

Chamomile can soothe, but for those with an allergy to this family of plants, which also includes daises and ragweed (responsible for common springtime allergies), the potential for hives and swelling hinders relaxation.

Lavender induces tranquility too, but it can also cause enough skin irritation that in May 2014 the Swedish Chemicals Agency (SCA) proposed a health warning on lavender products. The European Union is now considering labeling lavender, “May Be Harmful if Inhaled.” More specifically, a lavender allergy is caused by a compound within lavender extract called linalool. Linalool produces lavender’s fragrance and reacts with air to form the skin irritant. The natural extract of a lavender plant contains 20 to 40 percent linalool, depending on the plant variety, and chemists can synthesize linalool at a purity of 97 percent.

The more people use natural products, the more likely they are to develop an allergy to them, since reactions often occur with regular contact. These types of allergens are called sensitizers.

“People often think that when they become allergic to some thing it has to be something new,” says Dr. Michael Stierstoffer, a dermatologist practicing in the Philadelphia area. “But often it’s something that they have been repetitively exposed to and then at some point in time the immune system just decides to become allergic to it.”

Some types of allergies induce hay fever and asthma as the immune system dumps histamine and other inflammatory response chemicals into the blood stream in response to the allergen.  A Type 1 allergy, as it is known, can be fatal if the inflammation is so severe that the airway swells to the point of closing (called anaphylaxis).  A less extreme allergy (Type 4) occurs when lymph nodes absorb an allergen and tag it as suspicious.  Continued exposure assures the immune system of the allergen’s ill will and, eventually, contact with the allergen results in a scaly rash.  Both types of allergies can exhibit this sensitization lag time, though it’s more common with Type 4.

Stierstoffer says because of the frequent consumer assumption that natural equals better, more people encounter chamomile and lavender than in the past and thus more people react to them. “The more you get exposed to an allergen, the higher the chance that your body’s immune system will see it as something it doesn’t like and react to it.”

The best example of this is a sensitization study conducted with a natural product over nine years in Japan.  Researchers analyzed the low-dose exposure of 1483 patients to lavender oil. The study showed that between 1990 and 1998 the rate of allergy among participants increased from 1 percent to 14 percent, with a spike in 1997 when aromatherapy became trendy.

Since the turn of the millennium lavender’s popularity has only grown. Lavender is present in 90 percent of cosmetics products sold in the U.S. It’s found in places you would expect, like detergents and air fresheners, but it is also a common ingredient in less intuitive products, such as adhesives, plasters, and inks. Any scented product, be it cosmetic or stationary, most likely contains lavender. And, because of its proven sleep-inducing effect, products marketed to children—bubble bath, shampoo, lotion—contain lavender 70 percent of the time. It is this omnipresence that provoked the SCA to warn consumers of lavender’s potential harm.

No one knows why some people become sensitive to linalool molecules and others don’t. The exact percentage of the population affected depends on the source: Some studies report 2 percent of people break out in an eczematous rash from contact with lavender, while others claim it’s as high as 7 percent. Dr. Donald Belsito, a Columbia Medical Center dermatologist and panel member on two different boards that review ingredient safety, says experiments on mice suggest people’s genes may have the answer. “We are probably all born with whatever allergies we might potentially develop and then it is only with the correct exposures over time that those allergies become manifest,” he says.

Anything someone continually introduces to her body, whether synthesized or naturally occuring, has the potential to someday cause an allergic reaction. Slightly more than half of all linalool produced globally is man-made, but regardless of the source the allergic reaction is the same.

The skin irritation associated with lavender is less extreme than what Sara experienced with goat’s milk, and Cindy Jones doesn’t think the numbers are big enough to warrant a label that would taint lavender’s reputation. “I think one study I was reading in that filing was where they introduced the oxidized linalool to volunteers and they found 1.8 percent developed sensitivity. Which to me just seems low,” Jones says.

Lavender growers worry that a label warning on lavender products will affect sales, precipitating a lavender-free consumer trend. “If you couldn’t use lavender in cosmetics that would be pretty serious,” Jones says. (Or, as a presenter at the recent Society of Cosmetic Chemists annual meeting put it, “When you start to pass a regulation that means you can’t sell Chanel No. 5 anymore, things start to get dicey.”) He was exaggerating—Chanel could still sell its iconic perfume, but the warning label it would have to carry might make people reluctant to spritz themselves.

Stierstoffer cautions that once an allergy does occur it will not go away. “So people have to be forever vigilant once they have an allergy. They have to read labels.” If you have a lavender allergy he points out the importance of buying fragrance-free products (“unscented products” may still contain linalool to mask other odors). And even if you avoid the allergen for a long time re-exposure could lead to a breakout. “The immune system has a very good memory,” Stierstoffer says.

(via The Atlantic)

 

How to Read Cosmetic Ingredient Labels XL

You are looking to switch your hair care products to more natural alternatives in 2015.  You see this ‘natural’ gel in your local drugstore and decide to give it a try.  Is this product as natural as it claims to be?  Remember, I am teaching you Label Poise–how to walk the walk, talk the talk, and buy products that meet YOUR standards, whether natural, organic, or safe enough.  For instructions on Label Poise visit our Label Poise page.

The Label
LabelPoise40
The Ingredients

Aqua/Water/Eau: Safe!   Water is the ultimate moisturizer and is a key ingredient in many moisturizing products.

Sorbitol:  Safe!  Sorbitol is a sugar alcohol which is produced naturally in various fruits, though it can also be produced synthetically from glucose (via corn syrup [GMO?]).  Sorbitol is typically used as a thickener and humectant in personal care products, though it also has various other uses.  Sorbitol is not known to be carcinogenic, mutagenic, or teratogenic. It is not known to bioconcentrate in animals, though it can be a slight irritant upon dermal contact or inhalation in pure form.  (MSDS ; PubChem)

Glyercin: Safe!  Glycerin is a humectant that attracts moisture in the skin. Glycerine can be derived from fats and oils, or synthetically–which is not indicated here.  (MSDS)

Dehydroxanthan Gum: Beware!  This ingredient is made via the dehydration of xanthan gum. Dehydroxanthan gum is used as an emulsion stabilizer, film former, hair fixing agent, and viscosity controlling agent. No MSDS Found.

Benzyl Alcohol:  Beware!  This ingredient is made naturally by many plants or can be synthetically derived. It is typically used as a preservative and based on its placement on the list is in low concentration. Benzyl Alcohol is not known to be a carcinogen or teratogen, though it is a mutagen in bacteria and yeast, and may be toxic to the liver and central nervous system in pure form. Benzyl Alcohol can be slightly hazardous with skin contact, but due to its concentration it should be okay. (MSDS)

Lithium Magnesium Sodium Silicate: Beware! This ingredient is a synthetic silicate clay that is used as a bulking agent, viscosity increasing agent (aqueous), and viscosity controlling agent. No MSDS found. Lithium Magnesium Sodium Silicate is considered safe for use in cosmetic products by the Cosmetic Ingredient Review.

Parfum/Fragrance: Beware!  Fragrances are often synthetic. Though they are low in concentration in the product, there is still a small chance of having an allergic reaction.

Limonene:  Safe!  Limonene naturally occurs in the rind of lemon and other citrus fruits.  It is primarily used as a flavor and fragrance though it also has been used for industrial degreasing.  It is not known to cause cancer or gene mutations in humans and can have anti-cancer effects in pure form, though limonene and its oxidation products are suspected skin and respiratory irritants in some cases.  A product that has been sitting on the shelf for an extended period may oxidize, however, ingredients with antioxidant properties, such as Vitamin E (Tocopherol), may alleviate this.  This ingredient must be listed if it exceeds concentrations of 0.01% in rinse off products in the EU.  (MSDS)

Citronellol: Beware! Also known as dihydrogeraniol, Citronellol is a natural acyclic terpenoid and is used as a fragrance agent. Though it is considered Generally Regarded As Safe by the US FDA, it has use restrictions due to Citronellol’s ability to sensitize the skin. This ingredient is a skin and eye irritant, and is toxic to aquatic organisms. Citronellol is not known to be mutagenic or carcinogen. (MSDS; MSDS)

Linalool:  Safe!/Beware!  This ingredient is used as a fragrance and is banned in rinse off products above a concentration of 0.01% (or 0.001% in leave-on products).  It is naturally occurring in various plants and spices, though it may also be made synthetically.  It is considered a skin irritant (causing eczema) and allergen, though pure linalool can have anti-cancer properties.  Given that the concentration is likely quite low it should be fine unless you are allergic to it.

Acacia Senegal/Accacia Senegal Gum:  Safe!  This ingredient is a gum derived from Senegalia senegal, a deciduous tree that is native to sub-Saharan Africa. Also known as acacia gum, it is used as an astringent. Acacia Senegal Gum is not known to be toxic though it can be an eye, skin, and lung irritant in pure form. It is considered safe to use by the Cosmetic Ingredient Review in current use amounts. (MSDS)

 

 

Nature’s Pulchritude’s Critique:  While the 98% naturally-derived label cannot be confirmed simply by looking at the ingredients, however, the ingredients in this product are mostly rated Safe!, so feel free to give this a try.

Does Your Beauty Regime Change During The Winter?

Share your thoughts in the comments!  Expect a follow up post on how to manage during the winter months!

How to Read Cosmetic Ingredient Labels XXXVIII

A friend highly recommended a hair conditioner to you and you are in your local drugstore to purchase it. You get excited when you see so many great ingredients on the list and are so glad this product was recommended to you. Is this product as great as you think? Remember, I am teaching you Label Poise–how to walk the walk, talk the talk, and buy products that meet YOUR standards, whether natural, organic, or safe enough.  For instructions on Label Poise visit our Label Poise page.

The Label

LabelPoise38

The Ingredients

Water: Safe!   Water is the ultimate moisturizer and is a key ingredient in many moisturizing products.

Canola Oil: Safe!/Beware!  This ingredient is derived from the rapeseed and is used as an emollient and skin conditioning agent. This ingredient can also be genetically modified and contaminated with pesticides as an estimated 87% of all canola grown in the US was genetically modified in 2005.

Glycerin: Safe!  Glycerin is a humectant that attracts moisture in the skin. Glycerine can be derived from fats and oils, or synthetically–which is not indicated here.  (MSDS)

Cetearyl Alcohol: Safe! Typically naturally derived from Coconut and Palm Oils (though it can be derived synthetically), it is a mixture of Cetyl and Stearyl fatty alcohols.  This ingredient acts as a thickener and moisturizer in personal care products.  In pure form,  this ingredient can be a slight skin irritant and permeator, and is toxic to mucous membranes.  The is no data available on human toxicity, carcinogenicity, mutagenicity, developmental toxicity, and teratogenicity.  (MSDS)

Ceteareth-20: Beware!  A derivative of Cetearyl Alcohol (Cetyl and Stearyl Alcohol) and Ethylene Oxide (a known carcinogen), this ingredient is used as an emulsifier and emollient.  Ceteareth-20 is a penetration enhancer that can allow other (potentially) hazardous substances to enter your system.  This ingredient may also be contaminated with 1,4-dioxane, a known carcinogen, as well as Ethylene Oxide.  Carcinogen contamination depends largely on how well purified the chemical is.  Products with this ingredient should not be applied to damaged skin as it may result in kidney damage.  In pure form it can be a skin, eye, and respiratory irritant, however there is no information on carcinogenicity, teratogenicity, mutagenicity, or developmental toxicity.  (MSDS; MSDS)

Fragrance (Parfum): Beware! Fragrances are often synthetic. Though they are low in concentration in the product, there is still a small chance of having an allergic reaction.

Butyrospermum Parkii (Shea) Butter: Safe!  This ingredient is derived from the nut of the Shea Tree and is used for its moisturizing properties.  (MSDS)

Ceteth-20: Safe!/Beware! This ingredient is a polyethylene glycol ether of Cetyl Alcohol and is used as a surfactant and emulsifying agent. This ingredient can be a skin and eye ingredient in pure form, though there is limited toxicological information available. It is not known to be a carcinogen, however, polyethylene glycol can be contaminated with ethylene oxide and 1,4-dioxane–a suspected and known carcinogen, respectively. (MSDS;MSDS)

Glycol Stearate: Beware! Also known as glycol monostearate, glycol stearate is an ester of stearic acid and ethylene glycol, a known human toxin. It is primarily used as a opacifier (opaque, non transparent) and pearling agent and acts as an emulfisfier. In 2001, Glycol Stearol was used in hair conditioners in concentrations of 0.0001-3%. It is presently suggested for use in concentrations between 2-10% by weight of the formula, depending on the purpose in the product. Given it is an ester of ethylene glycol it may be contaminated with carcinogen 1,4-dioxane. It is not known to be a skin irritant up to 50%, based on patch tests, though it may be a mild eye irritant in pure form. It is not listed as a carcinogen, there is no data on mutagenicity. (MSDS; MSDS)

Petrolatum: Beware! This ingredient is also known as Petroleum Jelly is a hydrocarbon and is a distillate of crude (oil). It is used in skin lotions as an emollient and to prevent skin moisture loss. Similar to mineral oil, it prevents moisture from entering or leaving the barrier. There is no information on carcinogenicity, teratogenicity, mutagenicity, or developmental toxicity. Unless it is guaranteed 100% refined, petroleum may be with carcinogens. It can be a potential skin, eye, digestive, and lung irritant. (MSDS)

Aloe Barbadensis (Aloe Vera) Leaf Juice: Safe!  This ingredient is used for its nutrient content and moisturizing properties.

Cocos Nucifera (Coconut) Oil: Safe!  Coconut oil is used for is skin conditioning and moisturizing properties. It is high in vitamins E and K.

Simmondsia Chinensis (Jojoba) Seed Oil: Safe!  This ‘oil’ is a liquid wax and has a moderate fatty acid content.

Glycine Soja (Soybean) Oil: Safe!/Avoid! Soybean oil is used as an emollient and emulsifier. Produced from soy beans, this oil may be genetically modified, contaminated with pesticides, and thus contain a lower linolenic acid content. A source of origin would clarify this. Other than GMO and pesticide contaminate, soybean oil is not known to be toxic or carcinogenic.

Persea Gratissima (Avocado) Oil: Safe! This oil contains Vitamin E and contains antioxidants.

Prunus Amygdalus Dulcis (Sweet Almond) Oil: Safe! Sweet Almond oil is high in oleic acid and is primarily used as an emollient.

Mangifera Indica (Mango) Seed Butter: Safe! This ingredient is made from the seed of a mango and is known for its moisturizing properties.

Olea Europaea (Olive) Fruit Oil: Safe! Olive oil is used for its skin conditioning and anti-inflammatory properties. It is rich in vitamins E and A, as well as antioxidants.  (MSDS)

Mangifera Indica (Seed) Oil: Safe! Mango oil is extracted from the seed of a mango, and is the oil fraction obtained from producing mango butter. It is high in stearic and oleic acids.

Vitis Vinifera (Grape) Seed Oil: Safe! Grapeseed oil is high in linoleic acid and is high in beneficial antioxidants.

Macadamia Ternifolia (Macadamia) Seed Oil: Safe!  This ingredient is made by pressing macadamia nuts and is used for its moisturizing and emollient properties.  If you are allergic to tree nuts or macadamia nuts, Beware!

Melia Azadirachta (Neem) Oil: Safe! This oil is pressed from the fruit and seed of Neem, which is a tree native to India. It is high in oleic acid and is known for its moisturizing properties. It is used for a variety of purposes in traditional Ayurveda.

Daucus Carota Sativa (Carrot) Seed Oil: Safe!  Carrot seed oil is used as an emollient and skin conditioning agent.  It is high in omega 3 fatty acids, antioxidants, and nutrients such as Beta Carotene, vitamin A and Stigmasterol.  It is not known to be toxic, an irritant, or sensitizer.  (MSDS ; MSDS)

Argana Spinosa (Argan) Kernel Oil: Safe!  This oil is made from the kernels of the argan tree found in Morocco. It is high in oleic and linoleic fatty acids and is renowned for its hair repairing and moisturizing properties. (MSDS)

Silk Amino Acids: Safe! Silk amino acids are water soluble glycoproteins extracted from raw silk. It is high in serine and aids in moisture retention. Silk amino acids are producing by hydrolyzing silk proteins into smaller peptide chains of 18 to 19 amino acids. This ingredient has a high molecular weight and therefore does not absorb into the skin. It can be an eye irritant in pure form, though it is not known to be carcinogenic. (MSDS;MSDS)

Lonicera Japonica (Japanese Honeysuckle) Flower Extract:  Beware!  This ingredient is used in conjunction with Honeysuckle extract as a preservative.  It is not known to be toxic or an irritant in small quantities.  It should be noted that parabens are very similar in structure (essentially the synthetic version) to p-hydrobenzoic acid, the active ingredient in Japanese Honeysuckle extract.  It is believed to act similarly to parabens in the body.  (MSDS)

Laminata Cloustoni (Sea Kelp) Extract: Safe!/Beware! [Editor’s Note: The scientific name of this ingredient is actually Brown Algae.] This ingredient is used as a skin protectant and fragrance ingredient. No MSDS Found.

Salvis Officinalis (Sage) Leaf Extract: Safe!  This ingredient is used as a skin conditioning agent, skin protectant, and antioxidant.  It is generally regarded as safe and is not known to be toxic. (MSDS; MSDS)

Vitis Vinifera (Grape) Seed Extract: Safe! Grape seed Extract is high in vitamin E, flavonoids, linoleic acid, and phenolic procyanidins. It is used in cosmetics because of its believed antibacterial properties, and is thus used as a preservative. Grape seed extract is also used for its antioxidant properties as well as believed astringent and restoring properties. It is typically used in cosmetic forumlations between 5-10% of the formula. It can be an eye, skin, and lung irritant in pure form, though it is not known to be carcinogenic. (MSDS;MSDS)

Urtica Dioica (Nettle) Extract: Safe!  This ingredient is used for its conditioning and astringent properties.  Depending on the concentration Avoid! if you have high blood pressure as it is believed to increase circulation. (MSDS)

PEG-75: Beware!/Avoid! This ingredient is a polymer of polyethlene glycol and has a molecular weight of 4000. This ingredient is used as a binder, humectant, and solvent. No MSDS Found.

Polyquarternium-10:  Beware!  This ingredient is a polymeric quaternary ammonium salt of hydroyethyly-cellulose and is used as an anti-static agent and film former.  Polyquaternium-10 readily bonds to hair proteins and increases viscosity (thickness) of the conditioner.  It is typically used in concentrations between 0.2% – 2%.  At greater concentrations it can cause skin irritation.  No data available on carcinogenicity or mutagenicity.  It is not believed to be genotoxic.  I would not use this product unless you chemically relax or treat your hair.  (MSDS)

Phenoxyethanol:  Beware!/Avoid!  This is a preservative.  You will notice it is very high on the list of ingredients.    It is used because it is safer than formaldehyde-releasing preservatives, though the FDA released a warning about how it can impact the central nervous system and induce vomiting in infants.  It is also suspected to be a xenoestrogen (mimics estrogen), a cause of contact dermatitis and skin irritant.  In pure form phenoxyethanol is toxic to kidneys, the nervous system, and liver; it is an extremely hazardous eye irritant and a very hazardous eye irritant, though information on carcinogenicity, mutagenicity, teratogenicity, and developmental toxicity are not available.  It is banned in the EU and Japan in concentrations over 1%.  Therefore, one would assume it is either greater than the EU concentration restraint or it is in accordance, and the remaining ingredients in this product are at very low concentrations.  This ingredient is made from 2 carcinogens (benzene and ethylene oxide), though it itself is not known to be carcinogenic.  People around small children should ‘Avoid!‘ this ingredient, others should ‘Beware!‘.  (MSDS)

Ethylhexylglycerin: Beware! This ingredient is a glyceryl ether and is the condensation product of 2-ethylhexanol and glycerin. This ingredient is typically derived from vegetable oil, but goes through various chemical transformations before becoming the final product. It is used as a skin conditioning agent, deodorizer, and very mild preservative. It is typically used in concentrations of 0.0003 – 2% by weight of a formula. Though it is used in the treatment of eczema, it is believed to be a skin, eye, and lung irritant. It is not known to be carcinogenic, a reproductive, developmental toxin, or genotoxin. No Individual MSDS. (CIR Report; MSDS: Caprylyl Glycol & Ethylhexylglycerin).

 

Nature’s Pulchritude’s Verdict:  This product has A LOT of great ingredients in it.  It does not have any parabens or -isothiazoline preservatives.  Only problem with this product is all of those great ingredients come after both fragrance and petrolatum.  The first 5 ingredients in this conditioner are fairly good.  Canola oil is not a high quality oil and likely does not have the same effect on the hair as some of the other oils lower down on the list.  Fragrance being so high on the lists leads me to believe the ‘better’ ingredients in this product are low in quantity and may not have a significant impact on the hair.  I would try this product if it didn’t have petrolatum in it, though as is, it may be a great option for you or a friend!

How to Read Cosmetic Ingredient Labels XXXVI

You decided to finally try a product from a brand a friend has been raving about for months. The products are marketed as being 95+% natural, are available at your local pharmacy, and are at a good price point, all of which appeals to you. Is this product really as natural as it claims? Remember, I am teaching you Label Poise–how to walk the walk, talk the talk, and buy products that meet YOUR standards, whether natural, organic, or safe enough.  For instructions on Label Poise visit our Label Poise page.

The Label

LabelPoise36

The Ingredients

Water (Aqua):  Safe!   Water is the ultimate moisturizer and is a key ingredient in many moisturizing products.

Cetearyl Alcohol:  Safe! Typically naturally derived from Coconut and Palm Oils (though it can be derived synthetically), it is a mixture of Cetyl and Stearyl fatty alcohols.  This ingredient acts as a thickener and moisturizer in personal care products.  In pure form,  this ingredient can be a slight skin irritant and permeator, and is toxic to mucous membranes.  The is no data available on human toxicity, carcinogenicity, mutagenicity, developmental toxicity, and teratogenicity.  (MSDS)

Behentrimonium Chloride:  Beware! Also known as Docosyltrimethylammonium chloride, Behentrimonium Chloride Is a “quaternary ammonium compound” made from corn (likely GMO) or canola oil. It is used as an antistatic, detangling aid, conditioning agent, and disinfectant. This product is toxic to aquatic animals, however, the concentrations in the product are likely less than 3% and should not be harmful. This product can cause skin irritation upon prolonged or repeated exposure (via MSDS), though concentrations and exposure length is not likely enough to be harmful. In pure form Behentrimonium Chloride is also an eye irritant that can cause severe and permanent damage with prolonged exposure. In the U.S. it is used in concentrations of 0.2 – 7% by weight of the formula, depending on the product. It is banned by the European Union in concentrations over 0.1% in “ready to use” products. There is no data available regarding mutagenicity and carcinogenicity. (Author’s Note: Avoid if you are averse to GMOs, I don’t recall using this ingredient in a product so err on the side of caution.) (MSDS)

Cetyl Esters:  Beware!  This ingredient is derived from vegetable sources, such as coconuts, and is typically used as a thickener in cosmetics.  It is comprised of various fatty alcohols and fatty acids.  It is typically 1 to 3% of the weight of the formula.  There is no data regarding toxicity, carcinogenicity, or mutagenicity.  (MSDS)

Vaccinium Angustifolium (Blueberry) Fruit Extract:  Beware! This ingredient is used as a skin protecting and soothing agent. Blueberry Fruit Extract is typically used in concentrations of 5-10% by weight of a formulation. It can be an eye irritant in pure form. There is no toxicological information available for this ingredient. (MSDS)

Stearyl Dihydroxypropyldimonium Oligosaccharides:  Avoid!  This ingredient is used as a hair conditioning agent.  No Additional information available.  No MSDS.

Lupine Amino Acids:  Beware!  Lupine amino acids are used as skin and hair conditioning agents and humectants. This ingredient may be the same as Lupine Protein, which is a hydrolyzed protein from the seeds of the lupine plant. Lupine protein is not known to be toxic, though there is limited information available. (MSDS)

Fragrance (Parfum)**:  Safe!/Beware!  This is a generic listing of fragrance similar to other labels, however, they clearly indicate that the fragrance is ‘natural.’ This is just as ambiguous as other fragrance listings so Beware! if you are prone to allergic reactions from fragrances.

Helianthus Annuus (Sunflower) Extract:  Beware!  This ingredient may be an extract of the seeds or petals of the sunflower. Both extracts are used as skin conditioning agents to promote soothing and softening effects. Sunflower extract has a high vitamin F content. It can be an irritant to skin, lungs, and eyes, though it is not known to be carcinogenic. Very limited toxicological information available. (MSDS)

Trifolium Pratense (Clover) Flower Extract:  Beware!  This ingredient is an extract of Red Clover flower, which is native to Europe, west Asia, and northern Africa. It is believe to prevent hair loss and improve the elasticity and strength of hair. It is also used as an astringent and masking agent. Red Clover is a phytoestrogen and is believed to have estrogen-like effects and has been used as a treatment for menopause symptoms.  (MSDS; NIH Research)

Daucus Carota Sativa (Carrot) Seed Oil*:  Safe!  Carrot seed oil is used as an emollient and skin conditioning agent.  It is high in omega 3 fatty acids, antioxidants, and nutrients such as Beta Carotene, vitamin A and Stigmasterol.  It is not known to be toxic, an irritant, or sensitizer.  (MSDS ; MSDS)

Ipomoea Batatas Root Lees Extract:  Avoid!  This ingredient is made from white or purple sweet potatoes grown in Japan.  Sweet potatoes are very high in beta carotene, it is believed the nutrient quantity will translate to skin benefits. Very limited information available; no MSDS.

Glycerin:  Safe!  Glycerin is a humectant that attracts moisture in the skin. Glycerine can be derived from fats and oils, or synthetically–which is not indicated here.  (MSDS)

Guar Hydroxypropyltrimonium Chloride:  Safe!  Also known as cationic guar gum, this ingredient is a quarternary ammonium (positively charged polyatomic ions) derivative of guar gum (a natural substance). It is added to shampoos for its conditioning and anti-static properties. In pure form, the dusts of this ingredient may be an irritant, however, it is not toxic to the skin and is not known to be carcinogenic. Information on mutagenicity is not available. (MSDS; MSDS)

Trimethylolpropane Tricaprylate/Tricaprate:  Avoid! This ingredient is used as a skin conditioning agent and emollient. No additional information available. No MSDS.

Phenoxyethanol:  Beware!/Avoid!  This is a preservative.  You will notice it is very high on the list of ingredients.    It is used because it is safer than formaldehyde-releasing preservatives, though the FDA released a warning about how it can impact the central nervous system and induce vomiting in infants.  It is also suspected to be a xenoestrogen (mimics estrogen), a cause of contact dermatitis and skin irritant.  In pure form phenoxyethanol is toxic to kidneys, the nervous system, and liver; it is an extremely hazardous eye irritant and a very hazardous eye irritant, though information on carcinogenicity, mutagenicity, teratogenicity, and developmental toxicity are not available.  It is banned in the EU and Japan in concentrations over 1%.  Therefore, one would assume it is either greater than the EU concentration restraint or it is in accordance, and the remaining ingredients in this product are at very low concentrations.  This ingredient is made from 2 carcinogens (benzene and ethylene oxide), though it itself is not known to be carcinogenic.  People around small children should ‘Avoid!‘ this ingredient, others should ‘Beware!‘.  (MSDS)

Caprylyl Glycol:  Beware!  Caprylyl Glycol is used as a humectant, emollient, and wetting agent that also has anti-microbial properties. This ingredient can be synthetic or naturally derived though that information is not indicated on the bottle. It is not believed to be a skin or eye irritant, nor is it considered a mutagen. (MSDS)

Sorbic Acid:  Safe! This ingredient is a natural organic compound (C6H8O2) that is used as a preservative. It is typically produced via condensation of malonic acid and transbutenal. It is most active as an antimicrobial agent in acidic environments. It is a skin, eye, and lung irritant in pure form. It is not known to be carcinogenic. Other toxicological information is not available, though it is listed as “Generally Regarded As Safe (GRAS)” by the FDA and is considered safe by the Cosmetic Ingredient Review.  (MSDS)

 

 

Nature’s Pulchritude Verdict: Though this ingredient is marketed as being natural, there are quite a few “natural” ingredients in this product that have not been tested toxicologically. Some of the other non-natural looking ingredients also lack toxicological information. This product may be worth a try, but it is not as natural as it claims to be.