Tag Archives: ingredients

Review: Oyin Handmade Honey Hemp Conditioner

Oyin Handmade Honey Hemp Conditioner

This product was purchased by Nature’s Pulchritude. All opinions are that of Nature’s Pulchritude and have not be influenced in any way, shape, or form.

“Oh, Honey. It’s a natural humectant… nature’s gift for glowing, supple hair. Ah, Hemp Oil. With an incredibly rich array of Fatty Acids to ensure well-nourished tresses. Oh! Ah! Oyin’s Honey-Hemp Conditioner! How could it possibly be improved? Perhaps by adding just the smallest touch of Silk Protein and a generous dollop of Aloe Vera Gel… just to take the succulence over the top. ;o)”

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I first started using this product about 4-5 years ago. I wanted to try the products for a few month and eventually got my hands on their ‘snack pack.’ I have since purchased 2 of the 33 ounce bottles. This product was pivotal on my natural hair “journey” and has been a staple. I use this conditioner both as a rinse out and deep conditioner, and have also experimented with using it as a leave-in. It is a fantastic moisturizer and leaves my hair feeling like silk!

Product

This is a fantastic conditioner. Great ingredients, great quality all around. This product does what it claims. The 33 ounce bottle is very convenient because it has a pump. A little goes a long way. 1 33 ounce bottle last me about a year with minimum biweekly use. It has a moderately thick consistency–not runny, not stiffly thick, just right and easily spreadable.

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Scent

Sweet Citrus. That is the best way to describe how Honey Hemp conditioner smells. It smells really, really, really good. Depending on the products you use after conditioning the faint scent of the product will linger in your hair.

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Moisture

Nourish and Moisture. Check, Check. This product does a great job moisturizing my hair. It works well as a rinse out, but works better as a deep conditioner. 30 minutes underneath a hooded dryer is enough. The moisturized feeling is not from a heavy silicones, waxes, etc. but from true moisturization! My hair feels moisturized after completely rinsing the product out of my hair. [Author’s Note: My hair type is predominately 4a, normal porosity, moderate density]

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Detangling

I typically don’t use this product to detangle but it does work well for detangling. My hair is so well moisturized it does not re-tangle at all after detangling, which makes styling much easier.

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EnviroFactor
Ingredients: Purified Water, Organic Aloe Vera Gel, Behentremonium Methosulfate (and) Cetearyl Alcohol (emulsifier derived from colza oil), Honey, Virgin Hemp Oil, Coconut Oil, Vegetable Glycerine, Hydrolized Silk, Citrus Essences, Fragrance, Optiphen (preservative), and LOVE!

The only questionable ingredient in this product is optiphen, which is a mixture of Phenoxyethanol and Caprylyl Glycol. Phenoxyethanol is widely used in natural products and prompted my series “Preservatives in Natural Products.” I don’t think this ingredient is cause for concern, but I’d still like more unbiased peer reviewed studies to fully deem this ingredient Safe!

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4.85/5 Globes

Nature’s Pulchritude All-Star!

Highly recommended!

Have you tried this product? What did you think?

Review: Kiss My Face Ginger Mango Lip Balm

Kiss My Face Ginger Mango Lip Balm

This product was purchased by Nature’s Pulchritude. All opinions are that of Nature’s Pulchritude and have not be influenced in any way, shape, or form.

**INSERT IMAGE***

My lip balm search has yielded yet another great lip balm! Read about my lip balm ‘incident’ and my first great lip balm find. This product moisturizes and keeps my lips soft and supple as I reapply throughout the day!

Product

Certified organic, great supple scent, and it keeps my lips moisturized. Fabulous product! I have not experienced any allergic reactions.

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Flavor/Scent

The ginger in this product is so subtle it is almost non existent. The mango is the dominant scent. The overall scent is light and does not linger longer than 2-3 minutes. The product is flavored organically, no synthetic fragrances!

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Texture

This lip balm is smooth and buttery. The castor oil combined with beeswax is a great pair and it makes the lip balm feel substantial on the lips. It is heavy enough to know it is there, but it melts into your lips after several minutes.

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EnviroFactor
This product has 8 ingredients, all of which are USDA certified organic. For more detailed information about the ingredients read its Label Poise. I’m not too sure what “flavor” means but it may be proprietary essential oils? That is my major gripe with this product.

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4/4 Globes

Nature’s Pulchritude MVP!

How to Read Cosmetic Ingredient Labels XLV

The first Label Poise of 2016!  Continue to expect Label Poise every other Thursday in 2016! Have a product you want insight on?  Let me know in the comments!

I picked up this lip balm on my hunt for a quality, all natural, non irritating, moisturizing lip balm. My long time readers remember my unfortunate experience with a lip balm from a very well known brand. My ingredients to avoid are linalool and beeswax (as the first ingredient). My last lip balm selection turned out well. Will my streak continue This is Label Poise–how to walk the walk, talk the talk, and buy products that meet YOUR standards, whether natural, organic, or safe enough.  For instructions on Label Poise visit our Label Poise page.

The Label

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The Ingredients

Ricinus Communis (Castor) Seed Oil*: Safe!  This ingredient is used as an emollient, moisturizer, and skin conditioning agent. The type of Castor Oil in this product is unlike Castor Oil you will find in a drug store, as the castor seeds are roasted and the oil is typically extracted by hand. This ingredient is not known to be toxic or carcinogenic, though it is a suspected penetration enhancer.

Cera Alba (Beeswax)*: Safe!   This ingredient is derived from worker honeybees within a bee hive.  It is used as a thickener and skin barrier.

Cocos Nucifera (Coconut) Oil*: Safe!  Coconut oil is used for is skin conditioning and moisturizing properties. It is high in vitamins E and K.

Helianthus Annuus (Sunflower) Seed Oil*: Safe!  Sunflower Oil is comprised of triglycerides (esters of glycerol and fatty acids) and has a high Vitamin E content.  It primarily acts as an emollient and assists the skin in retaining moisture.

Flavor*: Safe!/Beware! Without knowing what flavors were used and assessment of toxicological information and benefits cannot be determined. The ingredient is certified organic, though that does not mean it may not have drawbacks.

Rubus Idaeus (Raspberry) Seed Oil*: Safe! Raspberry Seed Oil contains high concentrations omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids of linolenic, alpha linolenic, and oleic, which act as antioxidants for the skin. This ingredient is also high in alpha and gamma tocopherols (vitamin E, antioxidants) and carotenoides (vitamin A); it is believe to have anti-inflammatory properties. (MSDS; MSDS)

Rosa Rubiginosa (Rosehips) Seed Oil*: Safe!/Beware! This oil is extracted from the seeds of the ‘sweet briar’ rose native to Europe and western Asia. Rose hip seed oil is an emollient that is high in vitamins A and C. There is limited toxicity information available on oil extracted from this species of Rose, though it is unlikely to be of concern.

Aloe Barbadensis (Aloe) Leaf Extract*: Safe! The ingredient is used for its soothing and rejuvenating properties. It is believed to be a humectant and emollient.

*Organic

Nature’s Pulchritude’s Verdict:  My strategy worked again!  This product is certified organic and has 8 ingredients. The combination of Castor and Coconut Oils and beeswax work really well. Coconut and castor oil penetrate the skin well and contribute to healthy lips. The two ingredients of mild concern are aloe vera leaf extract and rose hip seed oil due to limited information. Interested in learning more about this product? Check back TOMORROW for the second ever Label Poise-Pulchritude Critique REVEAL!

Eat fresher? Another major food chain to drop artificial ingredients

Eat fresh, now with no artificial flavors, colors, or preservatives.  Banana Peppers colored with Yellow 5 is very interesting. It again shows that things are often not what the seem in food or cosmetics. In this instance there is no label to read to educate yourself.  There really is a shift occurring in fast food, or so the marketing suggests.

NEW YORK (AP), By Candace Choi, June 4, 2015 — Subway wants to give new meaning to its “eat fresh” slogan by joining the list of food companies to say it’s dropping artificial ingredients.

The sandwich chain known for its marketing itself as a healthier alternative to hamburger chains told The Associated Press it will remove artificial flavors, colors and preservatives from its menu in North America by 2017. Whether that can help Subway keep up with changing attitudes about what qualifies as healthy remains to be seen.

No Copyright Fringement Intended

Elizabeth Stewart, Subway’s director of corporate social responsibility, said in an interview that ingredient improvement has been an ongoing process over the years. More recently, she said the chain has been working on removing caramel color from cold cuts like roast beef and ham. For its turkey, Subway says it plans to replace a preservative called proprionic acid with vinegar by the end of this year.

Among its toppings, Stewart said Subway is switching to banana peppers colored with turmeric instead of the artificial dye Yellow No. 5. Without providing details, she said the chain is also working on its sauces and cookies.

The purging of artificial ingredients is quickly becoming the norm among major food companies, which are facing pressure from smaller players that tout their offerings as more wholesome. That has prompted so-called “Big Food” makers including Taco Bell, McDonald’s, Kraft and Nestle to announce in recent months they’re expelling artificial ingredients from one or more products.

Subway’s announcement comes at a challenging time for the chain, which grew to be the world’s largest restaurant brand by number of locations with the help of weight loss pitchman Jared Fogle.

The company is privately held and doesn’t disclose sales figures. But last year, sales for Subway stores in the U.S. averaged $475,000 each, a 3 percent decline from the previous year, according to industry tracker Technomic.

Subway is facing evolving definitions for what qualifies as healthy, said Darren Tristano, an analyst for Technomic. While older generations looked at nutritional stats like fat and calories, he said younger generations are more concerned about qualities like “local,” ”organic” and “natural.”

No Copyright Infringement Intended

“Change has come so fast and rapidly, consumers are just expecting more and more,” Tristano said.

And although Subway markets itself as a fresher option, he noted that people don’t necessarily see it as the healthiest or best product around.

Last year, Subway’s image took a hit when food activist Vani Hari, known as the Food Babe, launched a petition calling on it to remove azodicarbonamide from its bread, noting the ingredient was used in yoga mats. Subway has said that it was in the process of removing the ingredient, which is widely used as a dough condition and whitening agent, before the issue became a controversy.

Tony Pace, Subway’s chief marketing officer, noted the chain is already seen as a place for low-fat options, but that it needs to keep up with changing customer attitudes.

“As their expectations go up, we have to meet those expectations,” he said.

Pace said the use of simple ingredients is becoming a “necessary condition” to satisfy customers, but that it won’t be enough on its own to drive up sales.

How to Read Cosmetic Ingredient Labels XXXVII

Let’s talk makeup!  You picking up some pressed powder in a bind after running out recently.  You go for a pressed powder from a brand you have used in the past.  You know to check the ingredients on your hair and skin products, but never really though about your makeup!  You look at the ingredients and seen some familiar ingredients, yet several that you do not recognize.  Should you be more concerned about what is in your makeup?  Remember, I am teaching you Label Poise–how to walk the walk, talk the talk, and buy products that meet YOUR standards, whether natural, organic, or safe enough.  For instructions on Label Poise visit our Label Poise page.

The Label

LabelPoise37

The Ingredients

Talc:  Safe!/Beware!  This ingredient is a hydrated magnesium silicate that is formed via the hydration and carbonation of magniesium containing minerals such as pyroxene, olivine, amphibole, and serpentine. Mg3Si4O10(OH)2 is the chemical formula of talc. Talc is commonly used in cosmetics as an absorbent and anti-caking agent. There have been concerns about Talc being contaminated with Asbestos, however, when tested properly the present of asbestos can be detected. Contaminated talc should not be used in cosmetics. There are also concerns about links of Talc to lung and ovarian cancer, though they have not been conclusively supported by existing scientific literature. Asbestos free Talc is not considered to be a carcinogen to humans (Classified as Group 4 “probably not carcinogenic to humans” by International Agency for Research on Cancer [IARC], and A4 “not classifiable as a human carcinogen” by the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists [ACGIH]). Talc is an eye, skin, and lung irritant in pure form and is suspected to be toxic to lungs. (MSDS)

Mica:  Safe!  Mica is a mineral that is often ground and used for its reflective and refracting properties in various cosmetics, including moisturizing lotions. In pure form it can be a slight skin and eye irritant, as well as act as a toxin to the lungs and mucous membranes. Information on carcinogenicity, teratogenicity, mutagenicity, and developmental toxicity are not available. (MSDS; MSDS)

Octyldodecyl Stearoyl Stearate: Safe!/Beware! This ingredient is an ester derived from stearic acid and is a synthetic skin conditioning agent. Stearic acid is a fatty acid found in animal and vegetable fat. Octyldodecyl Stearoyl Stearate is often found in foundations, eye shadows, blush, and other face makeup. It can also be used as a non aqueous viscosity increasing agent and emollient. It is not known to be a mutagen, though it can be a skin irritant. A safety study conducted by the Cosmetic Ingredient Review found that Octyldodecyl Stearoyl Stearate was able to penetrate the skin, but not to deep layers. As of 2001, if was used on in concentrations of 2-15% (CIR). It can be a mild skin irritant.
(MSDS;CIR)

Dimethicone: Beware!  Dimethicone is a synthetic chemical polymer siloxane derived from silica.   They are used as a skin conditioning agent and form a protective barrier on the skin that prevents moisture from leaving or entering, which can be harmful to skin.  Dimethicone is the 5th ingredient in this product indicating its (quantity) in the formula.   (MSDS)

Hydrogenated Coco-Glycerides:  Beware! This ingredient is derived from hydrogenated coconut oil and is a mixture of mono-, di-, and tri- glycerides. This ingredient is used as an emollient and skin conditioning agent. It is used in concentrations of 0.04-10% in face powders, though its concentration of use ranges from 0.01-31% in cosmetics (CIR). There is limited toxicological information available on Hydrogenated Coco-Glycerides, though the safety of Coconut Oil was extrapolated to define this ingredient as safe under current usage standards. No Individual MSDS.  (CIR)

PTFE:  Beware!/Avoid! Also known as polytetrafluroethylene, this ingredient is a synthetic fluropolymer of tetrafluroethylene. This ingredient is very similar to Teflon. This ingredient is used as a slip modifier, binder, bulking agent, and skin conditioning agent. This ingredient has not been reviewed for safety by the Cosmetic Ingredient Review. PTFE is listed as non-irritating and non-absorbing on skin, though it can be toxic to lungs (Editor’s Note: It should be noted that PTFE is more commonly used for industrial purposes and use on skin in cosmetics is not well studied). (MSDS; MSDS; MSDS)

Lecithin:  Safe!  Lecithin is a lipid found naturally in animals and vegetables. Lecithin contains 4 phospholipids (phosphatidyl ethanolamine, phosphatidyl choline, phosphatidyl inositol, and phosphatidic acid. Lecithin is typically derived from soybeans, which are likely genetically modified, though sunflower (oil) or eggs can be used. Lecithin is used as an emulsifier, water binding agent, emollient, and viscosity controlling agent. It is typically used in concentrations of 0.5 to 5% by weight of a formula. This ingredient should not be paired with strong oxidizing agents. In pure form, Lecithin can be a slight skin, eye, and lung irritant. It is not known to be a carcinogen. Lecithin is considered safe in rinse off products and leave on products in concentrations of less than or equal to 15% (CIR).  Beware!  if you are averse to GMOS.  (MSDS; MSDS; CIR)

Methicone:  Beware!  This ingredient is a silicone polymer. It is typically used as a emollient, skin conditioning agent, antistatic agent, and occlusive. Like other silicones it creates a film on the skin and hair. No MSDS found. This ingredient is considered safe for use by the Cosmetic Ingredient Review. (CIR)

Sodium Dehydroacetate:  This ingredient is used as a preservative, and is an antimicrobial agent. Sodium Dehydroacetate is a sodium salt of dehydroacetic acid. This ingredient is an eye, skin, and lung irritant in pure form. There is limited knowledge of additional toxicological information.  (MSDS)

Methylparaben:  Beware!  This ingredient is synthetic and acts as a preservative with anti-fungal properties.  It is naturally occurring in fruits such as blueberries as p-hydroxybenzoic acid.  This ingredient is readily absorbed into skin and it along with other parabens have been at the center of controversy about its role in causing cancerous cells in breast tissue being that parabens are xenoestrogens (mimic estrogen).  There is not conclusive proof that states that use of personal care products containing parabens causes cancer.  Methylparaben is suspected to cause DNA damage and increased skin aging when it reacts to UVB rays.  It can be a skin allergen (dermatitis) in a paraben mix.  (MSDS)

Propylparaben:  Beware!  Propylparaben is used as an anti-fungal preservative, typically in concentrations less than 1%. It is commonly synthetically produced though it is produced naturally in fruits as p-hydroxybenzoic acid.  It is readily absorbed into the skin and metabolized, and has been found in urine in limited tests.  This ingredient is readily absorbed into skin and it along with other parabens have been at the center of controversy about its role in causing cancerous cells in breast tissue being that parabens are xenoestrogens (mimic estrogen).  There is not conclusive proof that demonstrates that use of personal care products containing parabens causes cancer.  It can be a skin allergen (dermatitis) in a paraben mix. (MSDS)

May Contain:
Iron Oxides:  Safe! There are 16 known Iron Oxides, which are chemical compounds composed of iron and oxygen. They are typically used in cosmetics as pigments, though this ingredient may be in this product as a contaminant. In pure form, Iron Oxides can be irritants to eyes, skin, and lungs. It is not known to be a carcinogen. (MSDS)

Titanium Dioxide: Safe!  Also known as CI 77891, this is a white pigment used for various applications. In pure form Titanium Dioxide is a potential human carcinogen when inhaled. Its health impacts are dependent on size (i.e. nanoparticles), based on the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). It should be fine to use in this topical product.  (MSDS)

 

 

Nature’s Pulchritude’s Verdict:  Makeup is a new realm we have not delved much into, but expect more on makeup in the future!  There are multiple ingredients in this product that are questionable.  Some ingredients are not my favorite in hair and skin products but are allowable, however, products you apply to your face and leave on your skin should be reviewed more carefully.  This product contains 2 types of silicones and parabens, which is not ideal, however, the shocker in this product is “PTFE.”  Most people will not recognize PTFE on a label, but they would recognize TEFLON.  Teflon?  Teflon?!  In makeup?!  Though none of the MSDS said it was a hazard on skin, something about teflon in makeup is problematic.  Pass on this pressed powder, just make sure what you buy doesn’t have similar ingredients!

Major Consumer Products Brand to Disclose Product Specific Fragrance Ingredients

Fragrances are arguably the biggest grey area when it comes to consumer products.  The chemical composition of fragrances are not disclosed on current consumer product labels because of trade secret laws.  However, it is widely believed that many fragrances contain allergens, irritants, possible* reproductive toxins, and possible* carcinogens.  Various reputable scientific studies have confirmed these beliefs.

SC Johnson Announces Plans to Disclose Product-Specific Fragrance Ingredients

First Major Company to Disclose Fragrance Ingredients; Builds on SC Johnson Ingredient Disclosure Leadership

Oct. 9, 2014  — SC Johnson announced today that it will expand its ingredient disclosure efforts by providing product-specific fragrance ingredient information. The announcement marks a transformational initiative by a major U.S. consumer packaged goods company to provide fragrance ingredient information at the product level.

Beginning in the spring of 2015, consumers will have access to the main ingredients used to create the fragrances in SC Johnson products. SC Johnson Chairman and CEO Fisk Johnson announced the initiative during his remarks at the American Oil Chemists’ Society World Conference in Montreux, Switzerland, on Thursday.

Expanding on its voluntary ingredient disclosure program, SC Johnson will begin disclosing air care fragrance ingredients present at the highest concentrations down to .09 percent of the product formula. The number of fragrance ingredients disclosed will vary by product but, on average, consumers should expect to find a range of 10 to 50 fragrance ingredients. Consumers will be able to access this information on WhatsInsideSCJohnson.com or by calling the SC Johnson consumer product helpline.

SC Johnson will first begin to disclose product-specific fragrance ingredients in its air care products – including sprays, candles, oils and gels – initially in the U.S. and Canada, followed by Europe. The program will then expand into other SC Johnson product categories, including home cleaning. For those product categories outside of air care, where fewer fragrance ingredients are used, SC Johnson will list fragrance ingredients present at a concentration of more than .09 percent in the final product or the top 10 fragrance ingredients, whichever provides the most information for consumers. Additional fragrance ingredients found in SC Johnson products that are not disclosed are present at extremely low concentrations and will continue to be available via the company’s online palette of fragrance ingredients.

SC Johnson has consistently been an industry leader in ingredient disclosure. In 2009, SC Johnson launched the site WhatsInsideSCJohnson.com to voluntarily disclose ingredients for the company’s lineup of air care and home cleaning products, each with a consumer-friendly list of ingredients. In 2012, SC Johnson announced the release of its Exclusive Fragrance Palette to provide consumers with a comprehensive list of the fragrance ingredients found in the company’s products. In 2013, the company began adding pest control and other registered products to the site.

(Press Release via Yahoo Finance Canada)

 

 

How to Read Cosmetic Ingredient Labels XII

Two weeks ago I told you about my Label Poise experiment, where I was on the hunt for a lotion that met my standards.  Out of about 50 products, I found 1 lotion that was somewhat suitable.  Many of the lotions I expected to have better ingredients, based on brand recognition and marketing, did not.  I was almost surprised.  This one of the lotions I expected to have good, if not great, ingredients.

The Label

LabelPoise12

The Ingredients

Water (Eau):  Safe!  Water is the ultimate moisturizer and is a key ingredient in any moisturizing product.

Glycine Soja (Soybean) Oil: Safe!/Beware!  Soybean oil is used as an emollient and emulsifier.  Produced from soy beans, this oil may be genetically modified, contaminated with pesticides, and thus contain a lower linolenic acid content.  A source of origin would clarify this. Other than GMO and pesticide contamination, soybean oil is not known to be toxic or carcinogenic.

Cocoglycerides:  Beware!   This ingredient is used as an emulsifier, emollient and thickener.  It is made of mono-, di-, and tri- glycerides derived from coconut.  Cocoglycerides are deemed safe for use by the Cosmetic Ingredient Review at presently used concentrations (0.4 – 14% for all products reviewed during 2006-2008), however, it does not have a MSDS.  This ingredient may very well be Safe!, however, that determination cannot be confidently made until there is toxicology information released for cocoglycerides.

Glyceryl Stearate:  Safe!  Also known as Glyceryl Monostearate, this ingredient is typically derived from vegetable sources such as palm kernel and soy oil, and is the glycerol ester of stearic acid.  It is used as an emulsifier, stabilizer, lubricant, and decreases the ‘greasiness’ of oils.  It is believed to form a barrier on the skin to decrease moisture loss.  In pure form is is a slight skin irritant.  The is no data available on human toxicity, carcinogenicity, mutagenicity, developmental toxicity, and teratogenicity. This ingredient is considered “generally regarded as safe” by the FDA.  (MSDSMSDS )

Dimethicone: Beware!  Dimethicone is a synthetic chemical polymer siloxane derived from silica.   They are used as a skin conditioning agent and form a protective barrier on the skin that prevents moisture from leaving or entering, which can be harmful to skin.  Dimethicone is the 5th ingredient in this product indicating its (quantity) in the formula.   (MSDS)

Glycerin:  Safe!  Glycerin is a humectant that attracts moisture in the skin. Glycerine can be derived from fats and oils, or synthetically–which is not indicated here.  (MSDS)

Cetearyl Alcohol:  Safe!  Typically naturally derived from Coconut and Palm Oils (though it can be derived synthetically), it is a mixture of Cetyl and Stearyl fatty alcohols.  This ingredient acts as a thickener and moisturizer in personal care products.  In pure form,  this ingredient can be a slight skin irritant and permeator, and is toxic to mucous membranes.  The is no data available on human toxicity, carcinogenicity, mutagenicity, developmental toxicity, and teratogenicity.  (MSDS)

Sodium Stearoyl Lactylate:   Safe!  This ingredient is an ester of plant derived lactic acid and a fatty acid (stearic acid) that has been neutralized by sodium hydroxide or sodium carbonate.  Though it is commonly used in food products, it serves as an emollient, emulsifier, and conditioner in personal care products.  It is typically used in concentrations of 0.5-10% by weight of the formula it is in.  This product is available EcoCert (international organic certification), though this product does not indicate that this ingredient is organic.  In pure form, Sodium Stearoyl Lactylate is a slight skin irritant and is not believed to be toxic.  The is no data available on human toxicity, carcinogenicity, mutagenicity, developmental toxicity, and teratogenicity.  There is some small incidence of allergies (contact dermatitis) to this ingredient.  (MSDS)

Helianthus Annuus (Sunflower) Seed Oil:  Safe!  Sunflower Oil is comprised of triglycerides (esters of glycerol and fatty acids) and has high Vitamin E content.  It primarily acts as an emollient and assists the skin in retaining moisture.

Butyrospermum Parkii (Shea Butter):  Safe!  This ingredient is derived from the nut of the Shea Tree and is used for its moisturizing properties.  (MSDS)

Macadamia Ternifolia Seed Oil:  Safe!  This ingredient is made by pressing macadamia nuts and is used for its moisturizing and emollient properties.  If you are allergic to tree nuts or macadamia nuts, Beware!

Aloe Barbadensis Leaf Juice:  Safe!  This ingredient is used for its nutrient content and moisturizing properties.  (MSDS)

Avena Sativa (Oat) Meal Extract:  Safe!  Oat Meal Extract is used for its anti-fungal, anti-inflammation, and believed beneficial properties for the skin.  It is typically used in concentrations of 1-10% by weight of the formulation.  It is not believed to be toxic.  (MSDS)

Cucumus Sativus (Cucumber) Root Extract:  Avoid!  Little information is available about Cucumber Root, there is plentiful information about Cucumber Fruit Extract.  The CIR does not have Cucumber Root listed with 7 other cucumber derived ingredients, therefore as a precaution this will be labeled Avoid! due to lack of information.  Please note that it may not be toxic in any manner, but there is no information to support that claim.

Tetrahexyldecyl Ascorbate:  Safe!  Tetrahexyldecyl Ascorbate is an oil-soluble Vitamin C ester.  It has a high lipid (fat) content and is believed to bind to skin better than Vitamin C (Ascorbic Acid).  It is believed to improve collagen production, have high antioxidant activity, and clarify and brighten skin by preventing pigment formation. It is typically used in formula in concentrations of 0.5-2% by weight, but can be used up to 10%.  Avoid!  if you are weary of the ‘brightening’ and prevention of pigment formation caused by this product.  (MSDS; MSDS)

Tocopheryl Acetate:  Safe!/Beware!  Tocpheryl Acetate is has antioxidant properties and can penetrate skin cells. It is generally regarded as safe however I saw some information (not on a MSDS) linking it to cancer so use your best discretion. (MSDS)

Retinyl Palmitate:  Beware!  Retinyl Palmitate is an ester of Retinol (Vitamin A) and palmitic acid (fatty acids of palm oil).  It is readily absorbed into the skin where it is converted to Retinol.  It is believed to add in collagen production, though it is concerned less effective in quantities lower than 20%, which is likely the concentration (<20%) in this product.  This ingredient is suspected to photomutagenic and forms free radicals.  It is also a suspected carcinogen and developmental toxin.  It may be toxic to the liver, central nervous system, skin, and gastrointestinal tract in pure form.  (MSDS)

Fragrance (Parfum):  Beware!  Fragrances are often synthetic. Though they are low in concentration in the product, here is still a small chance of having an allergic reaction.

Carbomer:  Beware!  Used as a thickener, typically at very low concentrations. This ingredient is not toxic, but can be slightly hazardous upon skin contact.  Concentrations likely not high enough to be hazardous.  (MSDS)

Methylchloroisothiazolinone:  Beware!  This ingredient is a preservative that is a known skin irritant, sensitize and allergen, as well as lung and eye irritant. It has strong antifungal and antibacterial properties. It is not known to be a carcinogen, though it is a skin sensitizer that can cause rashes and eczema in certain individuals. Limited to no greater than 0.0015% in rinse of products in EU and US (in conjuction with Methylisothiazolinone 3:1). No individual MSDS found.

Methylisotiazolinone:  Beware!  This preservative is a known skin irritant, sensitizer, and allergen; lung and eye irritant. Methylisothiazolinone has been linked to allergic contact dermatitis was named Contact Allergen of the Year in 2013. It is also believed to cause burns in pure form. This ingredient is also believed to be cytotoxic (toxic to living cells) and neurotoxic (toxic tot he nervous system) based on various studies, though information has been refuted due to the low exposure based on quantity in cosmetic formulas. It is not known to be carcinogenic. This ingredient is one of many that have been used to replace parabens. Methylisothiazolinone is also very toxic to aquatic organisms in pure form. Limited to no greater than 0.0015% in rinse of products in EU and US (in conjuction with Methylisothiazolinone 3:1). (MSDS)

DMDM Hydantoin:  Avoid!  This product is a used as a preservative and prevents (or slows) microbial growth in personal care products. This ingredient works by releasing formaldehyde (a known carcinogen) to kill or prevent microorganisms. In concentrations over 0.2% it is suspected to be a skin, eye, and lung irritant and may cause contact dermatitis.  (MSDS)

Sodium Hydroxide:  Beware!  Also known as caustic soda or lye, this ingredient is likely used to aid surfactants or increase pH. In pure form it can be dangerous, toxic to eyes, lungs, and skin, though it is typically used in low concentrations in personal care products. (MSDS)

Ingredients in this product has slightly changed!  New ingredients are in bold, removed ingredient is struck-through (via company website):

Water (Eau), Glycine Soja (Soybean) Oil, Cocoglycerides, Glyceryl Stearate, Dimethicone, Glycerin, Cetearyl Alcohol, Sodium Stearoyl Lactylate, Helianthus Annuus (Sunflower) Seed Oil, Butyrospermum Parkii (Shea Butter), Macadamia Ternifolia Seed Oil, Aloe Barbadensis Leaf Juice, Avena Sativa (Oat) Meal Extract, Cucumus Sativus (Cucumber) Root Extract, Tetrahexyldecyl Ascorbate, Tocopheryl Acetate, Retinyl Palmitate, Fragrance (Parfum), Carbomer, Methylchloroisothiazolinone, Methylisotiazolinone, DMDM Hydantoin, Sodium Hydroxide, Tetrasodium EDTA, BHT.

Though they are at the end of the list.  Tetrasodium EDTA and BHT are not ingredients you would want to use!

 

Nature’s Pulchritude Verdict:  I would not purchase this lotion.  It may be an effective moisturizer but it does not meet my Label Poise.  The 3 of the first 5 ingredients are okay, with Cocoglycerides and Dimethicone being ingredients you should be cautious of (Beware!).  I am not big on soybean oil and not knowing the source of origin of the soybeans (GMO or organic) does not make me willing to compromise.  The biggest concerns within this product are Cucumber Root Extract, Retinyl Palmitate, DMDM Hydantoin, Methylchloroisothiazolinone, and Methylisotiazolinone.  This product is listed at 97% natural and paraben free, despite the fact that ‘natural’ is an arbitrary term and the replacement for parabens can be a skin allergen and carcinogenic (formaldehyde releaser).  Though Cucumber Root Extract sounds innocuous and safe, that does not mean that it is.  The fact that the product has been reformulated to remove the Cucumber Root Extract solidifies my stance on categorizing ingredients with no available information as ‘Avoid! ‘ as a precaution.  The added ingredients are preservatives.

 

Would you buy this lotion?

How to Read Cosmetic Ingredient Labels XI

Who doesn’t like a nice body oil after bathing to moisturize the skin?  You are in the store and stumble upon a nice after bath oil.  Your skin has been a little dry lately and this would be a nice remedy.  Distracted by other things you temporarily forget your Label Poise and buy the product.  Once you settle down you remember to check the ingredients.  Did you make a selection that meets your Label Poise?  Remember, I am teaching you Label Poise–how to walk the walk, talk the talk, and buy products that meet YOUR standards, whether natural, organic, or safe enough.

Here are the tips I gave you in my first ten posts on how to read cosmetic ingredient labels:

  1. Ingredients are listed by quantity in the formula, from greatest to least, based on standards by the Federal Trade Commission (FTC).
  2. Ingredients are listed using the International Nomenclature of Cosmetics Ingredients (INCI), therefore they are listed using scientific nomenclature, or    binomial nomenclature (latin; taxonomy) for ingredients derived from plants.
  3. How ingredients are derived is seldom listed on the label (the same chemical can be derived synthetically or naturally).
  4. Fragrances are generically listed because they are considered trade secrets; typically naturally derived fragrances do not use “Fragrance (Parfum)” but a specific naming system.
  5. If it looks like a “chemical” it probably is, if you don’t want chemicals don’t buy it!  **Everything is a chemical, I’m referring to ‘bad’ chemicals here

Quick Tip:  Aside from avoiding synthetic chemicals as much as possible, have an idea of what ingredients do not work as well for you.  Pay attention to the ingredients in the products you use.  If you notice every time you use a product with [insert ingredient here] you get an allergic reaction or your hair/skin responds negatively, make a note and steer clear!

The Label

LabelPoise11

The Ingredients

Isopropyl Myristate:  Beware!  This ingredient is an ester of isopropyl alcohol and myristic acid, which is a saturated fatty acid that can be sourced from plant or animal sources. Isopropyl Myristate is used as a thickener, emollient, and penetration enhancer. It has a sheer feel that decreases the oily feeling of using a natural oil. There is mixed information suggesting it is comedogenic, and should be avoided by those with acne prone or oily skin. It can be an eye irritant, and slight skin and lung irritant in pure form. A patch test found 3 of 244 tested people developed contact dermatitis from this ingredient. It is not known to be toxic, and is not believed to be carcinogenic, mutagenic, teratogenic, or developmentally toxic (data “not available”).  (MSDS)

Sesame (Sesamum Indicum) Seed Oil:  Safe!  This ingredient is derived from sesame seeds and is used for its moisturizing properties. It contain large amounts of vitamins A and E.   Avoid! if you are allergic to sesame seeds.

PEG-40 Sorbitan Peroleate:  Beware!  This ingredient is an ester of polyethylene glycol and sorbitol fatty acids and is used as an emulsifying agent and surfactant. PEG-40 Sorbitan Peroleate is considered safe up to concentrations of 25%, though it may be contaminated with carcinogen 1,4-dioxane from the ethoxylation process. It is lowly toxic and is not believed to be a carcinogen.  No MSDS found.

Propylparaben:  Beware!  Propylparaben is used as an anti-fungal preservative, typically in concentrations less than 1%. It is commonly synthetically produced though it is produced naturally in fruits as p-hydroxybenzoic acid.  It is readily absorbed into the skin and metabolized, and has been found in urine in limited tests.  This ingredient is readily absorbed into skin and it along with other parabens have been at the center of controversy about its role in causing cancerous cells in breast tissue being that parabens are xenoestrogens (mimic estrogen).  There is not conclusive proof that demonstrates that use of personal care products containing parabens causes cancer.

BHT:  Avoid!  Also known as butylated hydroxytoluene, BHT is a lipophilic (likely to bind to fat) organic compound derived from phenol (-OH group attached to a benzene ring). It is typically used as an antioxidant to prevent foods or cosmetics with oils from spoiling. Various studies have deemed it carcinogenic whereas some claim it may have cancer fighting properties.  It is a skin, eye, and lung irritant in pure form. It is not listed as a carcinogen in humans by the IAR and ACGIH, can be mutagenic for mammalian somatic (reproductive) cells, may be toxic to the blood, liver, and central nervous system, and can damage target organs over prolonged exposure.  Despite being in a low (<10%) concentration in this product I would not recommend its use. (MSDS)

Fragrance:  Beware!  Fragrances are often synthetic. Though they are low in concentration in this body oil, there is still a small chance of having an allergic reaction as its specific components are not disclosed.

 

Nature’s Pulchritude’s Verdict:  I would not purchase this product.  As a general rule, when you are looking to buy any type of “oil” and oil is not the first ingredient, do not buy it.  Chances are you can buy the oil yourself for cheaper than what they are selling without any penetration enhancers, parabens, polyethylene glycol derivatives, fragrance, or BHT.  The way this product is formulated is likely to help the sesame oil absorb into the skin and decrease the oily, ‘greasy’ feel of oil.  Looking at the label my curiosity was to peaked to learn what exactly ‘BHT’ was, chances are it was made into an acronym for a reason.  Of course BHT is the abbreviation for butylated hydroxytoluene, whose carcinogenicity has been debated for decades, but is known to be toxic.  Why not just skip the added ingredients and apply a natural oil to your skin?

 

Would you buy this product?